Horse

Clinical trials for horses

  • Status:  Currently enrolling

    Description:

    Colic or abdominal pain is the primary equine emergency seen by field practitioners, as well as, clinicians in a hospital setting. Strangulating lesions of the small intestine are one of the most serious causes of colic and necessitate surgical intervention. Following small intestinal surgery, horses can have a variety of complications (eg., ileus, laminitis, diarrhea, incisional infections, intra-abdominal adhesions, and recurrence of colic) which often lead to prolonged hospitalization, increased costs, and decreased survival rates.  The goal of this study is to determine if horses with devitalized small intestine have bacterial contamination of their abdomen pre-operatively and if present, is there an association with the development of post-operative complications.

    Despite numerous studies examining post-operative complications following small intestinal surgery, we still have a poor understanding for the mechanisms leading to the most significant complications in our equine patients. To our knowledge, no studies have been performed evaluating the possibility that horses presenting with strangulating small intestinal lesions may have a previously unrecognized septic peritonitis on admission (to be determined by positive bacterial culture of peritoneal fluid). The goal of this study would be to examine any potential correlation of positive bacterial culture of the peritoneal fluid on admission with post-operative complications. If such an association was established with this study, culture of peritoneal fluid on admission may become standard of care, in addition to more aggressive management of these horses in surgery and in the post-operative period.

    We hypothesize horses presenting for suspected small intestinal strangulating lesions that have a positive bacterial culture of peritoneal fluid obtained on admission will have larger amounts and more compromised small intestine as compared to horses that have no bacterial growth. In addition, positive bacterial culture would predispose horses to increased post-operative complications (ileus, laminitis, incisional infections, adhesions and post-operative colic).

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Horses presenting for acute abdominal pain (colic) with suspected strangulating small intestinal lesion (dilated small intestine on rectal or ultrasound, serosanguinous abdominal fluid with elevated lactate, elevated blood lactate, positive net reflux and refractory abdominal pain). Horses must undergo exploratory celiotomy.

    Exclusion Criteria:

    Horses will be excluded (samples will not be submitted) if surgical evaluation does not confirm a small intestinal strangulating lesion.

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover the costs of initial fluid analysis, lactate and electrolyte analysis and culture of the abdominal fluid.   Your horse’s participation will also allow us to gain information which will help in the diagnosis/management/treatment of other horses with this condition. You understand that your animal’s participation in this study may not alleviate or cure his/her ailment.

    Contact Information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

     

     

     

     

     

  • CSRC Protocol # 113.16

    Status:  Currently enrolling

    Description:

    Diarrhea or enterocolitis can be a potentially serious or fatal disease in horses. Early treatment and differentiation between horses with self-limiting versus life-threatening diarrhea is therefore critical in the early phase of the disease. Delayed treatment can result in multiple serious complications, severe body-wide illness and potentially death, while excessive, prophylactic treatment measures are expensive. Thus, the goal of this study is to determine if biochemical markers or clotting times of blood (biomarkers) can distinguish between horses that will recover from enterocolitis with minimal intervention and horses with more severe illness that require aggressive medical therapy, early in the disease course.

    Rapid point-of-care testing for the presence of biomarkers in the blood will provide indication for more aggressive management of horses at risk for life-threatening complications from enterocolitis while reducing cost of treatment for those horses with predicted self-limiting diarrhea. This will help reduce the complications that can arise from delayed treatment, allow for early intervention when necessary, and improve outcomes in horses suffering from enterocolitis.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Horses >2 years of age that develop diarrhea in the hospital

    Exclusion Criteria:

    Surgery within 7 days prior to onset of diarrhea.

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover the costs of the blood tests to measure circulating inflammatory mediators. The other costs for the care of your horse are the same as you would experience normally. You understand that your animal's participation in this study will not in any way affect his/her outcome.

    Contact Information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at:  clinicaltrials@tufts.edu