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DISASTER MANAGEMENT

[Granoff, Room 251]

Natural disasters, outbreaks, and complex emergencies impact millions of lives worldwide each year, and cause billions of dollars in damage. Due to climate change and increased urbanization, both the magnitude of disasters and the size of the affected populations are increasing. While the common assumption is that all disasters lead to devastating disease burden and built environment damage, this perception is a myth. Some disasters (such as the 2010 earthquake in Chile) have only minor short-term damages; with as yet unknown potential long-term damages. Others, such as the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, have devastating short- and long-term consequences to both human life and the built environment. In this workshop, we will discuss the effects of disasters, focusing on: 1) short and long-term health impacts and damage to the built environment; 2) predicting disasters to determine where vulnerable populations are located; and 3) mitigating the impacts of disasters on vulnerable populations through forecasting, disaster risk reduction measures, and, lastly, providing evidence-based risk reduction measures to affected populations. The workshop will be led in panel format with 4-6 panelists each speaking for five minutes, and will be followed by a question and answer session and group discussion to summarize current state of knowledge and research gaps in understanding the impact of disasters on human and environmental health.

TEAM LEADER

Dr. Laurie Baise
Associate Professor,
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

TEAM LEADER

Dr. Daniele Lantagne
Assistant Professor,
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Dr. Shafiqul Islam
Professor,
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Dr. Kurt Pennell
Chair and Professor,
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Dr. Richard Vogel
Professor,
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Dr. Peter Walker
Director of the Feinstein International Center;
Irwin H. Rosenberg Professor of Nutrition and Human Security