Concept Selection

Homework 7 — Concept Selection Matrix

Joseph Poirier, Ethan Donnelly, and Alec Portelli

February 20th, 2020

User Needs:

Display — the product must be capable of displaying albums and, if possible, vinyl. A score of one indicates that the concept does not allow for effective display of records, whereas a score of five indicates a device that effectively and creatively displays the artwork.

Protection — the product must protect the records from damage and dust accumulation. A score of one indicates that the concept either does not address protection of records and/or would jeopardize the safety of the vinyl, whereas a score of five indicates superior protection.

Access — the product allows for easy access to records. A score of one indicates that a product will significantly hinder accessibility of records, whereas a score of five was awarded to designs that make records easier to access.

Space — the product will act as a space-saving measure. A score of one indicates a product that takes up a large area, whereas a score of five indicates a product which organises and compacts vinyl effectively and creatively.

User Wants:

Aesthetic — how well a design allows for aesthetic creativity. This includes allowing for different materials (wood, plastic, custom engravings, etc.) A low score indicates less room for creative freedom in the aesthetic design and a high score means the design has a lot of creative freedom. 

Multi — if the design is capable of holding multiple records on display. A high score means multiple records could easily be incorporated into the design where a low score means it will be virtually impossible to accomplish this. 

Cost — how expensive and time consuming the design is expected to be to manufacture. The lower the number for cost, the more expensive the design will be to complete.

Lights — if the design allows for the records to be illuminated. A low score means that it would be very difficult to incorporate lights into the design while a high score means it will be relatively simple. 

Spin — if the design allows for the vinyl to spin while on display. A high score for spin means this design feature could be easily incorporated while a low score means it would be virtually impossible.

Concept design table. Includes scores for each design. Higher score means better overall design.
Concept design table. Includes scores for each design. Higher score means better overall design.

The top design scores include iterations of design 7 as well as designs 4 and 5, which are much more minimalist than the latter two. We really like design 7 because of the flexibility it gives us as well as the fact it can hold many records and is very aesthetically pleasing. Designs 4 and 5 are much more simple but offer other design advantages that number 7 doesn’t. They can be put up on a wall and take up far less space than design 7. We have discussed design 4 and think it can be improved by making the casing thicker and allowing the spinning vinyl mechanism to slide back and forth. This would allow for multiple records to be stored behind the spinning vinyl and if it slides back and forth, the storage space will increase. One stack of records will be covered by the spinning record while the other stack will have the top record on display. Design 5 is by far the most accessible design as there is little effort needed to take the record off the wall when it is on design 5. Despite it also being very cheap, it offers little protection for the album art which is a major drawback. 

We have decided to pursue and continue making iterations of design 7 because it seems like it offers the most creative freedom and aesthetic potential. 

Our many brainstormed designs. For close up images of all the designs they can be found in the brainstorming section of Phase 2.
Our many brainstormed designs. For close up images of all the designs they can be found in the brainstorming section of Phase 2.