U.S. Strategy and Doctrine for Cyber Conflict and Deterrence

  • Date & Time: September 18, 2019, 12:30 pm
  • Speaker: Herb Lin, Senior Research Scholar at the Center for International Security and Cooperation, Hank J. Holland Fellow in Cyber Policy and Security, Hoover Institution.
  • Location: 205 Cabot Intercultural Center

Abstract: News stories over the last year or two indicate that the United States has begun to take a more assertive (and some would say aggressive) stance in cyberspace with respect to its adversaries, replacing views and perspectives of the previous Administration regarding the value of restraint in conducting offensive cyber operations.  This talk will review the basics of offensive cyber operations, address recent changes in U.S. strategy and doctrine for cyber conflict and deterrence, and comment on the implications of these changes.News stories over the last year or two indicate that the United States has begun to take a more assertive (and some would say aggressive) stance in cyberspace with respect to its adversaries, replacing views and perspectives of the previous Administration regarding the value of restraint in conducting offensive cyber operations.  This talk will review the basics of offensive cyber operations, address recent changes in U.S. strategy and doctrine for cyber conflict and deterrence, and comment on the implications of these changes.

Herb Lin, CISAC

Bio: Dr. Herb Lin is a Senior Research Scholar for Cyber Policy and Security at the Center for International Security and Cooperation and Hank J. Holland Fellow in Cyber Policy and Security at the Hoover Institution, both at Stanford University.  His research interests relate broadly to policy-related dimensions of cybersecurity and cyberspace, and he is particularly interested in the use of offensive operations in cyberspace as instruments of national policy and in the security dimensions of information warfare and influence operations on national security.

In addition to his positions at Stanford University, he is Chief Scientist, Emeritus for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies, where he served from 1990 through 2014 as study director of major projects on public policy and information technology, and Adjunct Senior Research Scholar and Senior Fellow in Cybersecurity (not in residence) at the Saltzman Institute for War and Peace Studies in the School for International and Public Affairs at Columbia University; and a member of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. In 2016, he served on President Obama’s Commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity.  Prior to his NRC service, he was a professional staff member and staff scientist for the House Armed Services Committee (1986-1990), where his portfolio included defense policy and arms control issues. He received his doctorate in physics from MIT.

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