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Ah! Those crisp mornings and leaf-y smells are not the only signs that Fall is almost here…it’s also time for September Workshops@Hirsh! No matter where you are working and studying this September, you can attend a virtual workshop to learn a new skills.

Workshops will be held on Thursdays from 12noon-1pm and will via Zoom. Registration for workshops is required.  A Zoom link and password will be sent to registrants one hour prior to the start time of the Workshop. 

If you have any questions about the September workshops, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can’t wait to see you!

 

Searching Basics: Strategic Searching using Concepts, Terms, & Boolean Operators (September 10)

Register: https://tufts.libcal.com/event/7045564

With strategic searching, you can rapidly set yourself up to either find more articles and other resources that might potentially be useful or to narrow down a search that has an overwhelming number of results. Yes, basic search strategies can meet either need! Get your intro to search logic with this workshop.

 

Remote Resources and Services @Tufts (September 17)

Register: https://tufts.libcal.com/event/7045565

Did you know that as a Tufts University student, faculty, or staff member you have access to Stata from home? Or that students have access to writing consultants to hone their voice and data lab assistants to consult with on stats or data-related projects? Come learn about remote resources and services such as Linked-In Learning videos, Mango Languages, and Library consultations that you can access from the comfort of your home. A list of online resources and services will be shared and discussed during this 1-hour intro workshop.

 

Approaching the Lit Review (September 24)

Register: https://tufts.libcal.com/event/7045566

In this workshop, students will learn how to approach the literature review. Topics covered include database selection, devising effective search techniques, limiting articles to relevant study-types, and tools for keeping track of results.

 

PubMed

Need help navigating the new PubMed? Never fear, our summer workshop series is here! Every other Tuesday in July and August, we’re holding out “Introducing the New PubMed” workshop. We’ll get you up to speed on the new interface changes and how they will impact the way you search. Each workshop will cover the same content, so you can feel free to choose whatever date is most convenient for you.

The workshops are held from 12-1pm via Zoom on the following dates:
July 14th
July 28th
August 11th
August 25th

You can find the workshop calendar here. Registrants will be sent the Zoom link the day before the workshop.

And, as always, if you have any questions about PubMed or anything else, you can Ask Us!

 

 

Back in October 2019 and March 2020, HHSL Staff walked around and counted how many people of each program were around the library. You may remember us, with the clipboards, asking that question.

Or…to be more accurate, we walked around throughout October, and half of March. We didn’t actually end up getting all of the dates we had wanted to in March (apparently there’s a global pandemic on), so we ended up with a truncated version of the survey for that month: 4 days of data instead of 7. Still, when it comes to trying to make a better Hirsh Library for everyone, even truncated data is better than none! So here’s some of what I can see.

Fair warning: I’m going to have to extrapolate and make a couple of assumptions here, since we’re missing so much of March’s potential data. I’ve seen enough data over the years to have a good sense of what it would be, but what should and what is are always different, so maybe get a salt grain ready to take with this post. Finally, the Y axis is always going to be Number of People Counted in this post, because I want this to be as easy to read as possible!

Graph of amount of people in the library during affilliation statistics in October 2019

Click to enlarge.

Graph of amount of people in the library during affilliation statistics in March 2020

Click to enlarge.

So, here’s the base data. October 2019 and March 2020. As you can see, we counted…actually not that many more people, all things considered. March 3rd, 5th, and even the 11th were all right in line with what we saw in October, in terms of library population. In fact the difference between the most populated day in October and the one in March is only 34 people. Which is great!

In case you’re wondering what happened on March 13th: that was the last Friday we were open normal hours. Staff, faculty, and students were already voluntarily staying home to work from there to keep themselves safe from the rapidly growing COVID-19 threat. On March 15th, the following Sunday, Tufts made the decision to close the campuses, and Monday the 16th was the last day the library was physically staffed in person (as a note, we are very much here for you online). So what you’re seeing in that data is the effect the virus was already having on the life of the library. March 11th: relatively normal day. March 13th: signs of a new normal.

But we’re not here for discussion of the virus, we are here for discussion of the data!

Direct comparison bar graph of the days of the week we counted in March and October

Click to enlarge.

So, this is the same data as above, but oriented on what days of the week a given date was. Although the by-the-date data has its place, it’s good to know, say, what a week looks like. This is what a week and a half look like! And this is where that missing data makes me sad, because we’ll never know what the other days looked like in March. Traditionally, the weekends are the slowest days of the week, and the busiest tend to be Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday. This is mostly matching, but…what was with that October Friday? My instinct is that it was an aberration, but without seeing in March it’s hard to tell how much of one it was. That a Friday was the busiest day we counted in October tells me that there must have been an event that day (a meeting? exams? a conference, perhaps?), but maybe it just chanced to be close to an exam.

In the end, one surprisingly busy day does not a library make. But it’s still fun to think about. Especially when you compare calendars to the data and realize that Friday, October 25th, happened to also be the second day of our pumpkin painting. Coincidence?

I think not.

Comparison of floor populations between October and March

Click to enlarge

Okay, last two charts! The first is the People by Floor. So this ignores dates, and focuses on the aggregate. One thing I’ve been noticing in the last year or so is that the counts we get on the 7th floor are always roughly twice that of the next closest floor (which alternates). As you can see from October, that sometimes makes for some goofy looking charts. This is one of those rare cases where the missing data actually won’t make any real difference. Barring anomalies, what you see with that chart falls in line with years of existing data. That one is one I always predict with easy clarity. Which brings us to the final, and everyone’s favorite: programs!

A graph comparing the number of people from each program counted during affiliation periods

Click to enlarge

This is sort of wild to look at. So, okay, Dental and Medical are the programs dominating the numbers. That makes perfect sense, and honestly outside of minor variations, that’s what tends to happen. They were close in October, though, so I would have loved to see what those numbers looked like in March. Especially given the sudden notable presences of PA, PHPD, and MBS. Look at that MBS presence in March! That’s so great to see. I love it when I see sudden jumps in the number of people in the library. We’re here for everybody, after all!

That’s it for me today. Thank you for reading along, and I hope to see you all online this summer, where we are all seven days of the week. If you’re unsure the best way to reach out, well, try checking out our Ask Us page. Or hey, you can still Schedule a Consultation. There are lots of options.

And remember: wear your mask.

Leo the skeleton wearing a homemade face mask

Photo credit: Tarlan Sedeghat

Stay safe everyone,
Tom

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The university has designated this Friday, June 19, 2020 as a Day of Reflection, Commitment, and Action for Racial Justice. In observance of this, Hirsh Library will be closed. We encourage you to use the day to participate in the programming the University has put together. We also invite you to join us from 3-4pm for a virtual discussion on resources for learning about, addressing, and coping with racism in the health sciences. Registration is now open and a Zoom link will be sent out an hour before the event.

In addition, we would like to share this statement of solidarity and commitment from the Tufts Libraries Council.

 

 

Two weekends ago, people in the United States and across the globe erupted with outrage not only at the murders of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and Ahmaud Arbery, but also at how Black lives have continued to be systemically devalued in all levels of society. Many people who identify as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), as well as white co-conspirators have continued to fight for racial justice prior to these protests. However, many are only now learning that these deep inequities exist in our society.

In order to help aid the learning process, specifically about the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement and how anti-Blackness is deeply entrenched in the health sciences/medical professions, the Hirsh Health Sciences Library (HHSL) is launching this Anti-Racism Resource Guide. It includes:

  • Information about the BLM movement
  • Resources documenting and addressing racial discrimination in health/medical professions
  • Mental health and community resources for those who identify as BIPOC
  • Educational material for co-conspirators

If you think there is anything we are missing in the research guide or you would like to provide us with feedback, please fill out this survey. We hope that this guide will be a helpful resource for you to either share with your community/ies and/or use as a starting point.

In addition, HHSL will be hosting a “tea” over Zoom (bring your own tea!^^) to talk about this research guide, its importance, and any questions you may have. Please join us this Friday, June 19 from 3 – 4 PM and register at this link. A Zoom link will be sent out an hour before the event.

Many events are planned for Juneteenth and we acknowledge and honor that you may wish to attend another event at the same time. If you need to miss our event but have questions or would like a walk-through of the guide, please contact Andrea at andrea.kang@tufts.edu.

Disclaimer: This is intended for use as a resource guide. Departments and Libraries throughout Tufts University have made or are planning to make respective statements separate from this guide.

Post contributed by Andrea Kang, Amanda Nevius, and Christina Heinrich

 

Citation Manager Logos: EndNote, Mendeley, Zotero

Looking for a citation manager but unsure which one to choose? Or writing a paper and not sure how to construct your bibliography? Citation management tools are programs that enable you to keep track of your research, manage citations, generate bibliographies in various citation styles (e.g. APA, JAMA, Chicago), and organize PDFs. These tools work directly with word processing programs such as Word and Google Docs and some of them even allow you to directly download and annotate PDFs or insert figures with captions into manuscripts. Our library staff has compiled information about the most popular citation managers to help you find the one that suits your needs in the research guides below:

EndNote: The Basics guide

Mendeley: The Basics guide

Zotero: The Basics guide

 

Also, be sure to check out our upcoming workshops for related content!
https://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu/events 

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Struggling with how to access library resources online? Trying to figure out how to navigate New PubMed? We have a workshop for that! Check out the workshops we have available for you below. All workshops will be online through Zoom. Once registered, a Zoom invitation will be sent out to you by the host closer to the workshop date.

 

How Can I Access That? Finding Full Text from Off-Campus

Date | Wednesday, June 10

Time | 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Are you finding it more difficult to find and read full-text of articles, books, and other resources now that you are largely off-campus? Never fear! With quick tips and tricks demonstrated in this workshop, you can once again access the full-text of resources you’re used to using on-campus.

 

Searching Basics: Strategic Searching using Concepts, Terms, & Boolean Operators

Date | Wednesday, June 17

Time | 12:00pm – 1:00pm

With strategic searching, you can rapidly set yourself up to either find more articles and other resources that might potentially be useful or to narrow down a search that has an overwhelming number of results. Yes, basic search strategies can meet either need! Get your intro to search logic with this workshop.

 

The Literature Review for Dental Protocols & Papers

Date | Wednesday, June 24

Time | 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Whether you are writing a protocol for a research project or you’re starting to write a paper with the hopes of publication, you need to complete a literature review. Learn why a literature review is needed for both scenarios and a framework for conducting one, as well as when you might want to ask a librarian for help. Please note this workshop is targeted specifically for dental protocol and publication needs, but all are welcome to attend.

 

Introducing New PubMed Series

Dates | Tuesdays, June 16 & 30, July 14 & 28, August 11 & 25

Time | 12:00pm – 1:00pm (for all workshops)

This will be an ongoing series of introducing the New PubMed and how to navigate the fresh interface and features. Feel free to join whichever workshop that works best for you!

 

Writing is hard; writing about yourself can be even harder.  If you are preparing a personal statement for your medical school or other application, then this workshop is for you.

Join us virtually on Tuesday, 3/31 from 11am-12pm for Writing Personal Statements.  Christine Smith, MS, RD, the writing consultant at our library, adjunct lecturer at the Friedman School and former Senior Editor of the Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter, will provide advice on crafting the perfect personal statement and will share her top writing tips.  We will also share resources on application writing and interviewing. Registration is available now! 

 

 

Congratulations on your match, class of 2020! We can’t wait to find out where you’ll be heading off to next. While we’re sad we can’t celebrate with you in person (with cake) today, we are there with you in spirit and will be following along on Instagram!

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Time to break out of the winter funk and spring into some new skills with March Workshops at Hirsh!

Workshops will be held in Sackler 510 on Thursdays from 12noon-1pm, unless otherwise stated. Learn more about Workshops@Hirsh at: https://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu/services/open-workshops 

EndNote: the Basics
March 5
This one-hour session will introduce you to the basics of using the citation management program EndNote. EndNote allows you to create a library of references, attach and read PDFs, and generate in-text citations and bibliographies in Word documents. This session is for beginners – no previous experience required!

Essentials of Data Management
March 12
In this workshop, we will review best practices for naming, organizing, storing, depositing your research data, and creating a Data Management Plan. Managing your data before you begin your research and throughout its life cycle is essential to ensure its current usability and long-run preservation and access.

Systematic Reviews: Laying the Groundwork
March 19
Come to this workshop to learn about systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and other types of high-level research reviews. We will discuss topics such as the elements of a systematic review, protocols, resources, timelines, and suggested databases.

 
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