Currently viewing the tag: "resources"

bones and book

“Dem bones, dem bones…” are coming to a TUSM Learning Community near you! For the next three weeks, the Hirsh Library will be taking some bones (and other assorted anatomy resources “on the road”)! Yes, it’s time for the “Anatomy Roadshow”!

What is the “Anatomy Roadshow” you ask?  The “Anatomy Roadshow” is an opportunity for TUSM students to learn about invaluable tools for studying gross anatomy. These tools include actual bones (!),  online self-assessment modules and  exclusive photographic atlases that aren’t available on the web. With gross anatomy, you definitely want to be ahead of the curve when it comes to discerning how best to study. We know that students are busy, so we’re bringing these tools directly to you!

We will be visiting the TUSM Learning Communities on Tuesdays from 12noon – 1pm. Here’s where we’ll be in the coming weeks:

10/25 – Park Street Learning Community (rooms 205-209) 

11/1 – Haymarket Learning Community (rooms 211-215)

11/8 – Aquarium Learning Community (rooms 305-309)

11/15 – Fenway Learning Community (rooms 311-315)

In the meantime, you can learn about anatomy resources at Hirsh Library at: https://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/anatomy  and  https://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu/find/equipment

Hope to see you there!

Tagged with:
 

 

September workshop logo

 

Welcome back! We missed you! Start off this academic year on the right note and enhance your research skills with workshops@Hirsh. This month, we are kicking off our Fall workshop series by presenting three workshops that cover fundamental skills and resources.  If you need a refresher or feel overwhelmed, these workshops are for you. We hope you will join us!

Workshops will be held on Wednesdays from 12noon-1pm via Zoom.

Registration for workshops is required.  A Zoom link and password will be emailed to you after you register.   Please note that workshops are open to only Tufts-affiliated individuals.

September 14 – Approaching the Lit Review

Description:
In this workshop, students will learn how to approach the literature review. Topics covered include database selection, devising effective search techniques, limiting articles to relevant study-types, and tools for keeping track of results.

Instructor(s):
Amy E. LaVertu (she/her) is the librarian liaison to the Friedman School of Nutrition, as well as the departments of Geographic Medicine & Infectious Disease, and Psychiatry at the Tufts Medical Center. 

Register: https://tufts.libcal.com/event/9584669?hs=a 


September 21 – PubMed: An Introduction

Description:
This workshop will introduce you to PubMed, the world’s premiere biomedical literature database.  We will review the content of this database, planning and executing a search strategy, narrowing search results, finding full-text, and exporting results to a citation management program.

Instructor(s):
Allie Tatarian (they/them) is a data librarian, liaison for the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, and former biologist with over 5 years of wet lab experience. Their experience as a researcher sparked an interest in scientific communication, particularly in the ways scientists communicate with each other (and their future selves). Contact them for help with search strategies, data management, or finding molecular biology tools.

Register: https://tufts.libcal.com/event/9620364

 

September 28 – EndNote: the Basics 

Description:
This one-hour session will introduce you to the basics of using the citation management program EndNote.   EndNote allows you to create a library of references, attach and read PDFs, and generate in-text citations and bibliographies in Word documents.  This session is for beginners – no previous experience required!

Instructor(s):
Paige Scudder (she/her) is Hirsh Library’s Data and Educational Technology Librarian.

Register: https://tufts.libcal.com/event/9591551?hs=a

 

Tagged with:
 

It is writing season! Between personal statements and thesis-writing, the realm of written word can be especially daunting. Plagiarism can occur in every part of academia, from grade school up to tenureship. It happens—sometimes intentionally and sometimes accidentally—to any type of writer. What’s important is taking responsibility for your own academic integrity when possible.

A quill writing on paperIn our plagiarism LibGuide, our librarian Amy Lapidow has outlined some excellent resources for the purposes of plagiarism checks. One of these is DupliChecker, which is a free online service that checks your work for copied material. Another is TurnItIn.Com. Below is Amy Lapidow’s instructions:

  • Turnitin
  • Check your paper! Look for “Open Class for Students” Class ID 20577570 with keycode “Capstone”
  • You should be able to add yourself to the class.
  • If you cannot add yourself to this class, please let us know and we can help.

Remember, if you’re having trouble during the writing process, you can make an appointment with Christine Smith, who is our writing consultant for the Boston campus.

Best of luck with all of your writing!

 

 

Tagged with:
 

Hello! Did you know that here at the library, we have a whole lot of skulls?

Not…not in our heads. I mean anatomical models. In fact, Hirsh Library has over 50(!) skulls you can check out, so you can study them and do awesomely in your classes. What kinds of skulls, you ask? Well, let’s take a look!

Real Skulls

Let’s start right at the top: we have real human skulls, and we have them in a few different ways. First up are the full skulls, which come apart into two or three pieces, depending on how the springs on the jaws are. The downside is that these skulls are on the older side, so there are elements that have sustained a little damage over the years. But all the same, we have them!

We also have half skulls. They are cut vertically, and can come with or without a brain, as seen below.

They’re all available for checking out, and follow the same four hour rules as all Reserve materials. We just ask you to be gentle with them. (But feel free to casually mention that you can check actual human skulls out from your school library to any members of your family who have never gone through health sciences graduate programs. The reactions you’ll get will enhance every visit home, guaranteed.)

Plastic Skulls

But, what if you don’t want real bone, or what if they’re checked out? We still have you covered with all of our plastic skulls! The most popular of these are probably the labeled plastic skulls, and we even have one that has muscle connections painted on, so you can get a better sense of how it all lines up. See for yourself:

The bonus of the painted skull is that it also looks festive, ready for holidays to freak out the more squeamish of your non-health sciences friends back home! All labeled skulls come with guides as to what those labels actually mean, so these are the go-to skulls of all students freshly dealing with head and neck anatomy. Welcome to the club.

What if you really want to take a skull apart? We’ve got you covered. Meet our unlabeled, plastic, bilaterally cut skull. It’s missing a tooth, so feel free to give it a semi-ironic nickname, like “Bitey” or “Smiles.”

Finally, the newest editions to our skull collection! We recently received about 40 skulls from the anatomy lab. They are plastic, unlabeled, come in special cardboard boxes that can fold out into display cases, and are in fantastic shape.

So there you go! We have 50+ skulls, mixed up over 7 different styles, and that’s not even touching all our other models – teeth, a brain that comes apart, a spinal cord, pelvises – even two full skeletons, the famous Leo and Theo! So swing on by the Library Service Desk on the 4th floor, and check out a new silent study buddy.

Just remember: you can pick your skulls, you can pick your nose, but you can’t pick your skull’s nose.

Oh. I, uh…guess you can. Looks like there’s always something new to discover with a Hirsh Library Skull!

Tagged with:
 

Need a break from studying? Looking for something for you and some friends to do during some free time? Stop by the 4th floor service desk and borrow a board game. We have Jenga, Uno, Operation, puzzles, decks of cards and more!

https://pixabay.com/en/play-stone-colorful-smilies-funny-1744790/

Looking for additional EBD learning opportunities to help you with your PICO assignment or your BaSiCSsss presentation? Want to brush up on your techniques? Have we got the Research Guide for you!

This past summer, our Dental Librarian put a team together to enrich the Evidence-Based Dentistry Research Guide. The Guide, which includes tutorials  you can watch, provides an outline of the process and includes a brand new Evidence Pyramid!

 

Evidence Pyramid” by Tufts University can be reused under the CC BY-NC-SA license

Still have questions? Ask us! Use one of the methods below to contact a librarian, schedule a consultation or stop by the desk.

For those working on BaSiCSsss presentations, don’t forget to reach out to your group librarian.

There is no better time to pick up new skills for the upcoming school year than now!

Tufts University subscribes to Lynda.com, which is a free online video-tutorial resource available to Tufts University students, faculty, and staff. It provides training in software such Microsot Office, Adobe products, data analysis and visualization tools, in addition to programming languages, and topics found under these broad categories:

  • 3D + Animation
  • Audio + Music
  • Business
  • CAD
  • Design
  • Developer
  • Education + Elearning
  • IT
  • Marketing
  • Photography
  • Video
  • Web

You can refine your skills in teaching techniques, public speaking, IT security, improve written communication, accounting, new standards, leadership skills, accessibility, how to use specific software and the list goes on! Lynda.com also offers learning paths that include a succession of videos on a focused topic.

To access Lynda.com and for more information, go to:  https://it.tufts.edu/lyndacampus or login by clicking the graphic below!

 

Post contributed by Berika Williams

 

Tagged with:
 


Studying abroad or plan to travel overseas for research or vacation? The Tufts University community has access to Mango Languages, which you can use to learn over 70 different languages! You can complete lessons on the website or download the free app on your mobile device to practice on the go.

To access, log in here with your Tufts credentials, then choose quick start to use the web interface as a guest, or create your own personal profile with a separate Mango login to save your customized language tutorials.

To use the mobile app, download it from the App store or Play store and log in using the login you used to create your personal profile.

 

Post contributed by Berika Williams

Tisch Library in Medford recently subscribed to The New York Times academic pass program.  This means that Tufts students, faculty and staff can register for a personal account to access The New York Times from their computer or mobile device, on and off campus.  For instructions on creating a personal account using the Tufts academic pass and answers to FAQ about our access, see this page: http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/nytimes.

Note: When creating an account, be sure to choose the correct link based on your location when registering (i.e. on or off campus).

 

Post contributed by Laura Pavlech

image credit: © 2017 Clarivate Analytics

 

Want to upgrade to the latest version of EndNote? Now you can!

EndNote x8 is the latest version of the popular citation management software program. It has the same functionality as previous versions, but also has updated icons and more sharing options, such as:

  • The option of sharing your entire EndNote library, references, PDFs and annotations with up to 100 people.
  • Allows for people sharing a library add to, annotate and use the library at the same time as well as keep track of who is making what changes to the shared library and when.

EndNote x8 is compatible with Mac Sierra OS and MS Word 2016.

To have x8 installed on your laptop or Tufts computer, contact TTS at 617-636-3376; it@tufts.edu) – or – stop by the TTS Help Desk on Sackler 5. Remember to ask TTS to
un-install any previous versions of EndNote from your computer!

If you have been using EndNote x7 or earlier, your libraries will be converted automatically to x8. However, just to be on the safe side, make a back-up copy of important libraries! You can learn about how to create a back-up copy of your libraries here; you may also want to consider storing your back-up libraries on Tufts Box.

 

Want to learn more about EndNote x8? Watch the “What’s New with EndNote x8” video:

https://youtu.be/AnXN41rLmZs

 

Tagged with:
 
Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.