Institute for Business in the Global Context

Where the World of Business Meets the World

Month: January 2018

IBGC Speaker Series – Spring 2018 Lineup

The Institute for Business in the Global Context (IBGC) is pleased to bring you relevant global business leaders as part of our Global Speaker Series, which has provided Fletcher students with substantive networking and recruiting opportunities for the past 16 years. Last semester, we hosted the CEO of Oliver Wyman, Partners at Dalberg & Accenture, along with Managing Director at Mathematica, among others.

Interested in working in the private sector or at the confluence of public/private worlds while making connections with potential employers?  Then, come and engage with this impressive lineup of executives, entrepreneurs, and academics—including Fletcher alumni! We are constantly adding new speakers, events to the calendar, so stay tuned.

February 2018

  • 7: Sarah Williamson, President, Focusing Capital on the Long Term
  • 26: Mariya Rosberg, F’04, Partner, Oliver Wyman
  • 27: Jorge Ramirez, F’98, Former CEO, Chile, AON

 March 2018 

  • 7:  Christian Bachheimer, GMAP’17, Chairman, Polycore Optical
  • 12: Jules Pieri, Co-Founder/CEO, The Grommet
  • 14: Jan Neutze, Director, Cybersecurity Policy
  • 26: Michael Cantara, GMAP’11, Senior Managing Director, Global Client Group, MFS
  • 28: Ajay Bhalla, Chief Security Solutions Officer, MasterCard

 April 2018 

Upcoming Conferences & Special Events IBGC is co-sponsoring

Come, participate, and showcase what make Fletcher the only place where the front page meets the business page!

The Aadhaar Opportunity

In an age rife with digital innovation, India has made two meaningful contributions: The number “zero” and Aadhaar. Okay, I cheated a little bit with the first one, given its pre-digital age origins, but let’s not allow petty details to get in the way. Aadhaar is a monumental IT project and a monumental vision for inclusion. Aadhaar, as a concept, lays the very foundation of trust in the digital age. And it does so regardless of caste, Facebook status or creed, across a billion people. Unfortunately, this also means that Aadhaar is a treasure trove of personal data on a billion people; therein lurks a parallel potential for widespread mischief. A journalist writing for The Tribune suggests that, indeed, such mischief can be pulled off rather easily.

Read the full op-ed from Dean Chakravorti in The Indian Express

Core to the work of The Fletcher School’s Institute for Business in the Global Context, the “Turn?” Series of conference examine regions of the world at a point of inflection. From Africa to Turkey to Greece in the past few years, these events bring together leaders from business, politics, and academia for timely discussions, exploring implications for the world at large and the region on the cusp of “turning.”

Why We Need Traditional Banking

This now-standard tallying of the benefits and risks of securitization omits the costs involved in the decline of old-fashioned banking itself. And those costs are quite significant. A financial system that downgrades the role of banks becomes dangerously dependent on nearly blind trust in generic credit scores — a risk still underappreciated even a decade after the financial crisis. The marginalization of traditional banking also discourages lending to small businesses, which are essential to America’s economic dynamism. And it tends to over-centralize the supply of money, and therefore of credit, in ways that distort our economic life.

Instead of applauding the greater “completeness” of anonymous debt markets, we should lament the marginalization of traditional banking. And we should work to reverse it.

Read the full piece from Prof. Amar Bhidé in National Affairs

Trust in digital technology will be the internet’s next frontier, for 2018 and beyond

After decades of unbridled enthusiasm – bordering on addiction – about all things digital, the public may be losing trust in technology. Online information isn’t reliable, whether it appears in the form of news, search results or user reviews. Social media, in particular, is vulnerable to manipulation by hackers or foreign powers. Personal data isn’t necessarily private. And people are increasingly worried about automation and artificial intelligence taking humans’ jobs.

Read the full op-ed from Dean Chakravorti in the San Francisco Chronicle