Institute for Business in the Global Context

Where the World of Business Meets the World

Category: Digital Planet (page 1 of 2)

In many parts of the world where technology is an integral part of daily life, enthusiasm for its benefits is rapidly giving way to concerns about its risks. Bhaskar Chakravorti, Dean of Global Business at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, explores this complicated relationship.

Learn more at sites.tufts.edu/digitalplanet/

EdTech, Curiosity, and Adaptability: Fletcher Alum Grant Hosford Helping Code the Future of the Digital Planet

“Learning to code … gives kids a powerful boost in other core subjects” – Grant Hosford, CEO, Codespark

Fletcher alumnus Grant Hosford is up to some amazing things as CEO of Codespark. Leaning on a basis of coding, Grant hopes to bring both real world computer science skills and a growth mindset to childhood education. “Coding requires students to learn transferable skills like pattern recognition and sequencing that are foundational for reading and math. So, learning to code with a visual app like ours gives kids a powerful boost in other core subjects,” he told Forbes. Through his work with Codespark, Grant is helping to build a foundation for the next generation in this increasingly digital planet.

Read the full article about Grant in Forbes

What brought Grant to Fletcher? Learn more in his 2017 Why Fletcher video below.

Associate Director of Research and Doctoral Research Fellow for Innovation and Change, Ravi Shankar Chaturvedi speaks on the latest Digital Planet Smart Societies research at Digital Nations 2030 in New Zealand.

Student Perspectives: Mobile Health – Innovations and Implications for the Digital Planet

by Mark Conway, GMAP

Recent studies out of the IBGC on the Digital Planet have highlighted how the adoption of digital technologies are impacting countries’ economies, competitiveness, their building of “smart societies,” and the building – as well as the undermining – of trust. Another area where the digital evolution is having a profound impact is Global Health – particularly in mHealth (mobile health) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Driven by the increasing penetration of mobile, access to healthcare training and services in even the poorest and most remote areas of the planet is being transformed.

The Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development released a report (2/17) on the potential of information and communication technologies (ICT) on global access to healthcare. The graph below shows the growth of broadband access between 2007–2016.

However, several other findings, listed below, are even more interesting.

Continue reading

Digital Solutions Can Help Even the Poorest Nations Prosper

Fast economic growth is the best way to reduce poverty. A recent Tufts University study found that digitization is one of the biggest drivers of a nation’s economic success. The report argues that that economic growth is mostly achieved by careful policy-setting—in other words, it’s best driven by government.

Of 60 countries the report measured, Bangladesh received the lowest score for its digital technologies. But the south Asian nation has no intention of staying in last place: It is in eighth place in the world for the pace of its technological advancement. That’s because of an ambitious approach to the digital economy.

Read the full piece, featuring our Digital Planet work, in WIRED

Will the US Get Left in the Digital Dust?

“We identified many hot spots around the world where these changes are happening rapidly and other spots where momentum has slowed,” the authors of the Digital Evolution Index said. “Two years on, depending on where we live, we continue to move at different speeds toward the digital planet.”

Read the full piece on DEI 17, featuring quotes from Dean Chakravorti in VOA News

The “Smart Society” of the Future Doesn’t Look Like Science Fiction

by Bhaskar Chakravorti and Ravi Shankar Chaturvedi

What is a “smart” society? While flights of imagination from science-fiction writers, filmmakers, and techno-futurists involve things like flying cars and teleportation, in practice smart technology is making inroads in a piecemeal fashion, often in rather banal circumstances. In Chicago, for example, predictive analytics is improving health inspections schedules in restaurants, while in Boston city officials are collaborating with Waze, the traffic navigation app company, combining its data with inputs from street cameras and sensors to improve road conditions across the city. A city-state such as Singapore has a more holistic idea of a “smart nation,” where the vision includes initiatives from self-driving vehicles to cashless and contactless payments, robotics and assistive technologies, data-empowered urban environments, and technology-enabled homes.

More broadly, we might define a smart society as one where digital technology, thoughtfully deployed by governments, can improve on three broad outcomes: the well-being of citizens, the strength of the economy, and the effectiveness of institutions.

The potential for technologies to enable smart societies is rising. For example, internet-of-things sensor applications are envisioned to deliver a wide range of services, from smart water to industrial controls to e-health. The market for smart technologies is predicted to be worth up to $1.6 trillion by 2020, and $3.5 trillion by 2026. Surely, given the size of the opportunity, increasing interest among governments and policy makers, and the explosion of relevant technologies, we can start to understand what smart societies are  and establish standards and ideals to aim for.

Read the full piece in the Harvard Business Review

“Our Digital Planet: Technology’s Global Impact on Lives and Livelihoods”

Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti spoke on the Digital Planet as part of Tufts University’s “Tufts Talks NYC” in December 2016.

View the video on YouTube

Where is the digital economy is moving fastest? Which countries are poised for rapid changes? Where is digital progress slow or stalled?

Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti helped provide the answers to these questions and many more as part of his webinar with the Harvard Business Review. The one-hour session, moderated by HBR editor Angelia Herrin, built on our cutting edge research into the digital economy with the Digital Evolution Index, previously featured in HBR with further coverage on Europe’s digital recession and the need for benchmarking in digital growth.

The executive summary of the webinar can also be found online.

If the above video does not  work, you can view it on the HBR wesite.

Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti to Host HBR Webinar – “Where the Digital Economy is Moving Moving Fastest”

We are on our way to becoming a truly digital planet. But every country is at a different place in the journey of becoming a digital economy, progressing at a different pace.

So just where is the digital economy moving fastest? Join Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti for a live and interactive FREE webinar through the Harvard Business Review, tomorrow at 12PM EST, to examine this question and the Digital Evolution Index (DEI), assembled by the Planet eBiz team here in the Institute for Buiness in the Global Context at The Fletcher School.


March 9, 2016
12PM EST
hbr.org/webinars

Dean Chakravorti will share insights on where the digital economy is moving fastest, which countries are poised for rapid changes, and where the digital process is slow or stalled, all as part of this live webinar.


More on the DEI:

To better understand the status of 50 economically important countries in becoming a digital economy, the Fletcher School at Tufts University has created a Digital Evolution Index (DEI). This index shows how countries compare in readiness for becoming a digital economy.

In analyzing these 50 countries, they have been sorted into four trajectory zones:

  • Stand Out – High levels of digital development and an upward trajectory.
  • Stall Out – high levels of digital development but losing momentum.
  • Break Out – low levels of digital development but with the potential to develop strong digital economies.
  • Watch Out – countries with low level of digital development, and with significant opportunities and challenges. Some seem stuck while others may overcome challenges and break out.

Learn more and read the report

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