Orders from Above: Curated Resources Exploring Social Norms and Public Authorities

Research Associate Cori Simmons curates a list of key resources exploring the role of social norms among public authorities. We know that public authorities, like anyone else, are influenced by pressures and expectations – but if it’s your boss pressuring you, can we call that a social norm? Read more for what the literature has to say on this.

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M&E of the Intangible: Resources on Social Norms

In this post, Dhaval Kothari provides a curated list of published literature which will give you an insight into different M&E tools and methods adopted in various projects focusing on social norms change. This list is intended to help practitioners and organizations use the existing wisdom as a starting point to formulate their respective M&E frameworks for social norms change.

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Another Piece of the Puzzle: Locating Values and Social Norms within Context

In this post, Cori Simmons talks about values: one aspect of cultural context that is often overlooked, but is important for understanding social norms and behavior change. Being clear about what values are and how they relate to other factors that drive behavior is important for understanding cultural context and, therefore, designing more appropriate, effective anti-corruption programs.

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What You Must Know to Differentiate Norms from What’s Normal

Getting past the ‘all things that are normal are norms’ is critical to accurately diagnosing the social norms that do drive a corrupt pattern of behavior (e.g. bribery, sextortion), which in turn is necessary to devise effective strategies. This post offers up four ‘lessons’ to remember when differentiating between what is normal and social norm driven behavior.

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Corruption: Is the Law Blindsiding a More Meaningful Discourse?

Jane Ellis, editor of the book “Corruption, Social Sciences and the Law: Exploration Across Disciplines” says focusing on the supply side of corruption is a blunt instrument as it ignores the reasons why and/or the circumstances in which corruption in some countries may occur. Here, she argues for a multidisciplinary & collaborative approach to these issues.

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