A Good Contagion: Social Norms Makes Its Move in Anti-Corruption Thinking

Social norms theory is picking up steam in the anti-corruption sector, appearing more widely and deeply in the anti-corruption ecosystem of workshops, conferences, literature, and blogs. We’re excited and intrigued by the questions being raised – read on to hear our thoughts on it.

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Why You Should be Using Social Media to Change Corrupt Behaviors

Top-down, structural approaches are only one way to address corruption, but it ignores a critical element of the problem: the behaviors of those who engage in corruption. Social and behavior change (SBCC) offers a new way of thinking about this element.

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Everything You Need to Know about Social Norms and Corruption

Did you know social norms can act as a brake to sustainable behavior change? That there’s a body of research on how social norms influence behavior? We didn’t either – until now. Read our new Social Norms Reference Guide to see what we’ve learned.

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Three Reasons Why Actors Working in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States Must Stop Ignoring Social Norms

By Diana Chigas and Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church. Those of us who work to stop abuse of power – in the form of corruption, criminal activity, violence, state capture, etc. – are increasingly recognizing that social norms are key to achieving sustainable behavior change. We assert that in fragile and conflict-affected states (FCAS) social norms — the mutual expectations about what is typical and appropriate for members of a group — are even more important. Given their critical role in driving behavioral choices, programming that ignores social norms can have serious negative consequences.

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Anti-Corruption Programs — Know Your Crowd!

Social norms exist within a group. They represent mutual expectations, not just common beliefs, within the group about what is the right way to behave in a particular situation. And it is the approval, disapproval or other social sanction from the members of the group that helps ensure compliance with the norm. Therefore, understanding the group — who is in and who is out — matters for programming.

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How Might Gender Roles Affect Whether You Engage in, or Hold Back from, Corruption?

In this post Kiely Barnard-Webster explains two key takeaways for practitioners from our recent field visit to the DRC: (1) If an anti-corruption program threatens a gender group’s privileged status, this must be taken into account in the program design or it will undermine effectiveness. (2) If anti-corruption strategies don’t account for the different ways in which gender groups engage in corruption these strategies may not work.

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