Venezuelan Migrants in Ecuador and Underground Remittances

This talk by Natalia Espinosa Tokuhama briefly touches on the socio-economic and political history of the Central America, discusses the mechanics of the remittances scheme, and gives an overview of migrant financial health in Quito.

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The Humanitarian Ecosystem: Examining the Role of Migrant Assistance in Quito, Ecuador

By Dani Douglas, under the supervision of Kim Wilson A team of researchers from The Fletcher School of Law and

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A Shared Universe (for Most): Ecosystems in Public Spaces and Migrant Livelihoods

By Madison Chapman, under the supervision of Kim Wilson Two young Colombian women sit next to a small iron pushcart

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Parque La Carolina

A hub for work and play, Parque La Carolina acts as a microcosm of migrant and local dynamics in Quito,

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Innovation (Charlie, Josephina and Juan)

“Ratcheting-up” livelihoods through entrepreneurship and innovation allow migrants to get a foothold in their new home

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Formal vs. Informal

Registered and unregistered sellers in La Carolina compete for social and retail space in the park amidst growing inter-group tensions.

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No Sweat – If You Are a Woman

By Madison Chapman, under the supervision of Kim Wilson. What does it mean to have dignity and personal agency as a migrant? Men and women told their stories to me in very distinct ways, through body language and in their retelling of traumatic events. What does this tell us about understanding gender in ethnographic research and the stories we do and do not hear while interviewing?

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You and I Are Not Friends: The Challenges of Ethnographic Study in the Migration Field

By Padmini Baruah, under the supervision of Kim Wilson. Transnational migration has been one of the most talked-about phenomena of the past decade. With prolonged armed conflict, economic crises, and climate change affecting different parts of the world adversely, it is not a surprise that an estimated 258 million people live in a country that is not the country of their birth.1 Much news has been generated on this subject, and multiple studies have focused on the macro aspects of this issue. However, equally vital is not losing sight of the fact that while broad patterns and theories can explain the macrophenomenon of transnational migration, each migrant’s story is ultimately a subjective and entirely personal lived experience. The powerful contribution of the individual narrative as well as of ethnographic observations to academic studies in this field cannot be overlooked.

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