Posts Tagged Community

Grad Student Fun

Did you know that Tufts has a  Graduate Student Council, which aims to bring together graduate students from arts, sciences, and engineering? The council’s new video promotes the fun, interesting, and helpful activities they plan throughout the year – social events  like an apple picking trip and pub nights, community outreach including a holiday food drive, and student advocacy and career development events.

Graduate students can also always gather in the GSC Student Lounge in the basement of West Hall. So head to West Hall to meet your fellow graduate students and we’ll see you on the apple picking trip!

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Cookie Monsters

This past spring, the Tufts campus was hit with a new phenomenon: a cookie craze. Unlike some brief crazes that have swept our campus this past spring (YOLO, anyone?), the cookie madness is here to stay. Surprisingly enough, the operation is a one-man show run by John, a RIT grad who bikes around campus delivering cookies, and is affectionately known to all Jumbos as the “Cookie Man.” The entire campus has adopted the Cookie Man and his Sweet Idea- he is now a part of campus culture. HerCampus Tufts praised his charm and good looks along with his cookies, Tufts Entrepreneurs Society invited him to speak at one of their meetings, and he even worked with engineering student and fan Simon Metcalf, E13, to ‘trick out’ his bike.

Needless to say, Tufts has fallen in love with the Cookie Man. Don’t believe us? Check out this video of the man himself breaking some Jackson Jills hearts at their last spring show.

 

Not convinced? Then check out this video of  Michael Rogove, A13, proposing to the Cookie Man.

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Jumbo Bonds Across Generations

Evan Weinberg, E03, discovered his passion for teaching through a resident tutor in math and physics he maintained while at Tufts. The fall after graduation, he began teaching math at the ninth grade level through the New York City Teaching Fellows program. Nine years later, Evan proudly praises one of his first students’ recent graduation from his alma mater, explaining the special connection two Jumbos share across generations:

It isn’t a miracle that he will cross the stage to receive his Tufts diploma today. Far from it – he did the hard work to get where he is, and I can’t take credit for the great things he learned both in my presence and away from it. And his story is far from over – I hope he (like many other students I’ve told this) keeps me in mind if I ever need a job. His story, and those of the rest of his class earning degrees this month, make me incredibly proud to be a teacher.

That said, there is something special about our story. The unique way that Tufts now connects us is unlike any I’ve ever had with others, even with my own Tufts classmates in the class of 2003. I hope that he can look back fondly to his times on campus as I do from time to time. For whatever small part I served in getting him there, I am glad to have helped him out.

Evan currently teaches Advanced Algebra/Algebra 2, Geometry, Calculus AB, Physics, and a robotics elective for both middle and high school students at the Hangzhou International School, currently serving 300 students K-12 from around the world. The excerpt above was taken from his personal blog about teaching, learning and technology.

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Learning Through Service

For Chris Swan, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, the classroom extends well beyond the grounds of the Tufts Medford/Somerville campus. From hazardous waste cleanup around Boston to water purification in Ecuador with Engineers Without Borders, Swan uses service learning to give students authentic, real-world experience to help drive home the lessons they learn in class.

Listen as Swan details how his students benefit from service learning—and what it means for engineering education.

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Text Your Teacher?

Imagine if, in high school, you had the option of communicating with your teachers through text messages. Though the idea may raise some questions, Peter Levine, director of CIRCLE and research director of the Tisch College of Citizenship, spent some time with OneVille, a community research and action project in Somerville, Massachusetts, discussing tools to foster communication between high school students and their community. Together they went over the pros and cons of the application of this idea in an alternative school for students who had been expelled from, or opted out of, the main public school:

They  used Google Voice as the texting service, which meant that the messages were archived. Having an archive creates advantages for the students and teachers (they can go back and see what they wrote), and it enables research. It may also have some disadvantages. Among other things, it creates a record that may have to be disclosed to parents under certain circumstances.

We reviewed anonymized transcripts of teachers texting students to wake them up; students disclosing health problems and depression to teachers (and explicitly preferring to communicate by text as opposed to voice); and a traditionally angry teenager thanking his teacher by text. Clearly, the medium affected relationships and power hierarchies, although not necessarily in a uniform way. Whether the changes were educationally beneficial is one big question. Another question is what would happen if the experiment moved from a small, alternative school to a regular high school in which each teacher briefly meets more than 100 kids every day?

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GradLife

The Tufts Graduate School of Arts and Sciences boasts a vibrant community that supports and enriches all aspects of life at Tufts. The community is constantly building its members up and creating networks and advice blogs to support graduate student life. Recently, they tweeted a blog post from Danielle Rosvally, G16, praising a furry friend who helps her finish her work. She delightedly replied

@TuftsGSAS thanks for all the rts! Really appreciate the support from my school!

Want to get additional GSAS perspective? Follow Dean Lynne Pepall on Twitter.

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Tara Anasti on Beyond the Farm

2010 Tufts School of Nutrition graduate Tara Anasti is a writer for the Seeds for Learning program’s blog “Beyond the Farm.” Seeds for Learning is a program dedicated to creating school-based farms in Philadelphia along with community outreach and entrepreneurial education. Anasti’s most recent post is about planning for the coming fall season in the garden:

Here at the farm, we are watching our summer crops become exhausted and beginning to prepare spent beds for fall planting. Using our crop plan from the last year’s season, we rotate the location of our fall plantings. Crop rotation is a critical technique for organic agriculture. Rotating crops prevents crops from depleting the soils of the same nutrients.

She also wrote about students’ classroom experience:

Our high school students gained much experience in growing, cooking and selling food to their community this summer and our K-8 campers learned about climate science in their new outdoor classroom space at the farm. For the fall, Seeds for Learning will continue to educate our student farmers about food justice and the food system.

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The Sharewood Project

Medical students and doctors of the Tufts University School of Medicine are providing free health care to under-served communities in the Boston area through The Sharewood Project. Sharewood, located in the First Church in Malden, operates Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 9 PM and provides clinical care, case management, laboratory work, and other health care services for free and without a scheduled appointment.

Recently, the AsianBoston‘s radio station conducted an interview with representatives from the Tufts Medical School about the Project.

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Tufts Roundtable Commons: Blogging for Conversation

Tufts Roundtable Commons, a campus blogging community a la The Huffington Post, bills itself as a place for “Community. Freedom. Expression” and argues that, “You’ve heard these words before, but you’ve never seen it like this.”

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