Last week, about a year and a half after the original launch of World Peace Foundation’s Compendium of Arms Trade Corruption, we published a new, revamped version of the Compendium (same address). We have added more by way of images, a resources page, a handy reference table of cases (increasingly necessary as […]

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A British Member of Parliament has proposed starving Ireland as a negotiating tactic.

If this remark were on the historical record for the 1840s, when the British government administered mass starvation in Ireland, it would join the black book of infamy, evidence for the inhumanity of the British establishment.

But last week, Priti Patel, MP […]

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At the outset of the war, it might have been reasonable to hope that pressure would force the Houthis to submit. Since it takes months to starve people, a brief period of hardship would not have involved a level of suffering disproportionate to the military objective. But, within months of the launch of the war, humanitarian agencies were warning of crisis, and there were no indications of Houthi surrender. By persisting with this method of war, Bin Salman knew for sure that thousands of Yemeni children would die from hunger and disease.

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Basil Zaharoff provides the archetype of the shady, jet-setting individual. But today, the corruption that suffuses the global arms trade, also includes the respectable, marquee, multi-billion dollar arms companies, with top stock exchange quotations, boardrooms filled with the great and the good, and close access to governments; and indeed, the activities of these two contrasting faces of the arms business are often closely intertwined and interdependent.

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