From the monthly archives: August 2019

Earlier this week, on August 27th, we launched a new occasional paper, Introducing transnational Conflict in Africa dataset. Today, we are publishing a memo, Implications of the TCA that highlights policy implications of the core research finding: existing datasets have systematically under-represented the level of transnational political violence (covert war, militarized disputes, support […]

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The Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC) have hammered out a deal with the generals who took power after the fall of long-serving ruler Omar al-Bashir. They have agreed to a 39-month transitional period. During this time, Sudan’s ultimate authority will be a Sovereign Council of five civilians and five generals, with an eleventh member to chair it – initially a soldier, later a civilian. A technocratic government is being set up and an interim national assembly appointed. Negotiating the power-sharing formula was hard enough – solving Sudan’s deep-seated political and economic problems is going to be harder still. Newly-appointed Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok is under no illusions about the challenge he faces. He is not a politician. He is an economist, a technocrat who has spent the last decades in the African Development Bank and the UN Economic Commission for Africa.

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WPF with our partners at the Conflict Research Programme are pleased to announce the publication of a new occasional paper, “Introducing the Transnational Conflict in Africa Dataset,” by Allard Duursma, Noel Twagiramungu, Mulugeta Gebrehiwot Berhe and Alex de Waal (August 2019). Below is an overview of its key points. The full paper can be downloaded

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China is in a quandary. Uncowed Hong Kong protesters are forcing Beijing to confront its version of the question plaguing global politics: how much discontent can be stifled while still reaping the benefits of liberalized global economy? It is the one-party state version of a similar game being played in western democracies. Economic-political elites are everywhere attempting a delicate maneuver: maintain free flow of financial capital that is the source of their wealth and privilege, while  diluting and diverting expressions of popular discord produced by the resulting gross inequalities of wealth. In each location the dynamics are distinct; everywhere the official responses refuse to face the root of the problem

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