From the monthly archives: September 2019

Mass starvation is a white-collar war crime. When there’s a man-made famine (the gendered language is deliberate–we have yet to witness a women-made one), there can be no excuse that the deprivation was perpetrated in the heat of the moment, or by rogue elements acting beyond orders. This is the case in Yemen today: four […]

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WPF’s Senior Fellow, Sam Perlo-Freeman culminates two years of research with the WPF — and building on a career of expert analysis on the global arms trade –with a new occasional paper, “Red Flags and Red Diamonds: the warning signs and political drivers of arms trade corruption” (World Peace Foundation Occasional Paper #21, September […]

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Just Security today ( Sept. 19, 2019) published a new blog essay by Ilya Sobol and Margherita Stevoli (who is a partner in our project Accountability for Starvation, with Global Rights Compliance). It offers insightful analysis of the recent bombing of Saudi Arabian oil facilities, and we cross-post it below.

As was reported over […]

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Reducing the size of the international arms trade is a seemingly impossible task. The current sale of UK and US arms to Saudi Arabia provides a telling example of how egregious arms sales to provision a war zone are extremely difficult to stop in the face of state resistance and vested corporate interest.  In this […]

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Jacob Rees-Mogg MP, leader of the House of Commons, was pictured languidly taking a nap in the middle of the most momentous debate in the British Parliament for many decades. Rees-Mogg had earlier dismissed the motion for Parliament to take control of its agenda, to stop a no-deal Brexit, as “constitutionally irregular.” His idiosyncratic concept of parliamentarians’ role—in the current context—is to serve as the emissaries of the people who voted for Brexit.

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The WPF with Global Rights Compliance (GRC), partners in the project “Accountability for Starvation: Testing the Limits of the Law,” have published a series of memos documenting how existing international law might apply to starvation conditions, and why it should be applied to Syria and South Sudan. Today we publish our third […]

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