From the monthly archives: May 2021

On May 16th, 2021, dozens of Israeli aircrafts were involved in the bombing of what the Israeli air-force described as “homes and offices” of Hamas and Islamic Jihad in Gaza. This included two entire apartment buildings. The total number of people killed in the airstrikes in Al-Wihda street that night was 43; of them, […]

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Why is it important to have clarity and consistency in data, especially related to deaths? In the first instance, all people deserve dignity in death, no matter the situation or circumstances of dying. At the most basic level, their deaths count; and the accounting should be accurate. People who died while incarcerated were the under direct care and responsibility of the state. Because the state has claimed this responsibility, the lives – and deaths – of incarcerated people are of public concern. Further, these numbers are not overwhelming. There is no reason that the DOC should be unable to produce an accurate public record. Finally, while it has been extremely difficult to verify the accuracy of information released by the DOC on some matters, like testing and positive cases, the inaccuracies regarding deaths give credence to concerns that the overall data DOC has released on the COVID-19 outbreaks in Massachusetts’ prisons contains flaws.

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Development Partnerships or Transactional Politics? An Insight into the Continent’s Struggle for Economic Transformation” was originally published May 12, 2021 on the

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By Aditya Sarkar and Tanya Aggarwal. The severity of the second wave of the pandemic in India is not an accident. It is the direct consequence of Mr. Modi’s deliberate and careful hollowing out of India’s institutions and centralization of power, unwillingness to listen to contradictory viewpoints, and efforts to win elections, no matter what the human cost. …Irrespective of what happens to Mr. Modi, the scale of this tragedy means that we, the people of India, will have to account for its personal and political costs in the years to come. Perhaps in ways we do not yet understand.

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Elizabeth Gray, Chirrilo Madut, Bol Mawien, Chris Newton, and Naomi Pendle

Humanitarians struggle to warn about, prevent, and respond to starvation when the population of concern is either small or large but not concentrated geographically. Perhaps nowhere else in the world is this challenge faced more frequently than in South Sudan. Over the last […]

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