Posts by: Alex DeWaal

Sudan after Bashir

On April 18, 2019 By

If the civic opposition can seize the day, they could well set the agenda in their talks with a disoriented soldiery. If they cannot, the situation could quickly deteriorate. Gosh’s resignation is a warning. He is a merciless operator and no one expects him to go quietly into retirement. The security bosses all have foreign ties: the Islamists (currently sidelined by the coup) have backers in Qatar and Turkey; Ibn Auf may be gone but others in the high command are close to Egypt; Burhan and Hemeti have led troop deployments in Yemen on the Saudi payroll; Gosh is close to the United Arab Emirates. The security hydra – multitudinous, avaricious, with each faction backed by a rivalrous foreign patron – poses an ominous threat.

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On Thursday, a cabal of military officers, security chiefs and paramilitary commanders overthrew President Omar al Bashir, who had been in power since 1989. All were Pres. Bashir’s most senior lieutenants. Their intent is clearly to keep the existing system intact—with all the power and privilege that they enjoy. But it was one of the […]

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It will be tempting for the United States, the United Nations and the African Union to congratulate General Ibn Auf on the overdue removal of Mr. Bashir and the promise of stability, and leave democratic change to news bulletins. That would be a mistake: The work of solving Sudan’s problems is only just beginning.

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Alex de Waal wrote early on April 11, 2019 for the BBC about the evolving situation in Sudan. While Bashir has been overthrown, de Waal’s commentary concerning what will come next remains the most pressing question. For the full story, with images, maps and video access it on the BBC website.

Sudan’s President […]

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Last weekend, the first few days after the United Kingdom’s long-heralded, anti-climactic Brexit Day, the online petition to Parliament to revoke Article 50 and stay in the EU hit 6 million signatures. The various pro-Brexit petitions mustered a tenth of that number. The previous weekend, a million people rallied in London to demand the […]

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In South Sudan’s political marketplace, a bad peace deal—or a badly-implemented peace deal—can be as bad as no deal at all. A collapsing peace deal has the potential of unleashing exceptionally severe violence.

According to the ‘do no harm’ precept, those who design peace agreements and steer their implementation, should not allow optimism of the […]

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