Posts by: World Peace Foundation

WPF’s Senior Fellow, Sam Perlo-Freeman culminates two years of research with the WPF — and building on a career of expert analysis on the global arms trade –with a new occasional paper, “Red Flags and Red Diamonds: the warning signs and political drivers of arms trade corruption” (World Peace Foundation Occasional Paper #21, September […]

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Just Security today ( Sept. 19, 2019) published a new blog essay by Ilya Sobol and Margherita Stevoli (who is a partner in our project Accountability for Starvation, with Global Rights Compliance). It offers insightful analysis of the recent bombing of Saudi Arabian oil facilities, and we cross-post it below.

As was reported over […]

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The WPF with Global Rights Compliance (GRC), partners in the project “Accountability for Starvation: Testing the Limits of the Law,” have published a series of memos documenting how existing international law might apply to starvation conditions, and why it should be applied to Syria and South Sudan. Today we publish our third […]

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Earlier this week, on August 27th, we launched a new occasional paper, Introducing transnational Conflict in Africa dataset. Today, we are publishing a memo, Implications of the TCA that highlights policy implications of the core research finding: existing datasets have systematically under-represented the level of transnational political violence (covert war, militarized disputes, support […]

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WPF with our partners at the Conflict Research Programme are pleased to announce the publication of a new occasional paper, “Introducing the Transnational Conflict in Africa Dataset,” by Allard Duursma, Noel Twagiramungu, Mulugeta Gebrehiwot Berhe and Alex de Waal (August 2019). Below is an overview of its key points. The full paper can be downloaded

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In a new op-ed published by the Guardian (July 11, 2019), our colleagues in the Accountability for Starvation project, Mohammad Kanfash and Ali al-Jasem (both of Damaan Humanitarian Organization) argue why accountability for starvation crimes cannot go unaddressed.

Amid a war that may have cost 500,000 lives, we must hold the Syrian government […]

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