Posts by: World Peace Foundation

The WPF has been honored to have Philip Khoury as a WPF Board Member since 1999. His term will finish in early 2019, and we thank him for his insights and commitment over the years.

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In this short video [8:21 minutes], Andrew Feinstein, our colleague from Corruption Watch UK,  discusses his role revealing massive corruption in a South African arms deal from the late 1990s. At the time, he was an ANC member of Parliament on a committee charged with oversight of the deal. Feinstein describes how the corruption […]

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In this 2-minute video, WPF’s Sam Perlo-Freeman introduces the Compendium of Arms Trade Corruption. Learn what is included in the Compendium, how it might surprise you, and what patterns it reveals.

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Basil Zaharoff provides the archetype of the shady, jet-setting individual. But today, the corruption that suffuses the global arms trade, also includes the respectable, marquee, multi-billion dollar arms companies, with top stock exchange quotations, boardrooms filled with the great and the good, and close access to governments; and indeed, the activities of these two contrasting faces of the arms business are often closely intertwined and interdependent.

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So, can social nutrition be revived or re-invented to analyse the structural causes of todays protracted crises, famines and mass starvation? This raises big issues of whether the current political and organisational constraints and economic interests in the current medicalised approaches can be overcome and how. Can nutritionists find a way out of their current paradigm of individualisation, medicalisation and de-politicisation? This requires not only a review of the potential role of social nutrition, but also an analysis of who and what is driving the current agenda, and who is already contesting it. Perhaps the current famines and the focus on accountability for mass starvation can be a starting point.

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Bill Hartung, a colleague from our project, Indefensible: Seven Myths that Sustain the Global Arms Trade, has just authored an important new report, U.S. Military Support for Saudi Arabia and the War in Yemen (Center for International Policy, November 2018). Below is an excerpt of he Summary and Key Findings, we recommend reading the […]

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