Posts by: World Peace Foundation

So, can social nutrition be revived or re-invented to analyse the structural causes of todays protracted crises, famines and mass starvation? This raises big issues of whether the current political and organisational constraints and economic interests in the current medicalised approaches can be overcome and how. Can nutritionists find a way out of their current paradigm of individualisation, medicalisation and de-politicisation? This requires not only a review of the potential role of social nutrition, but also an analysis of who and what is driving the current agenda, and who is already contesting it. Perhaps the current famines and the focus on accountability for mass starvation can be a starting point.

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Bill Hartung, a colleague from our project, Indefensible: Seven Myths that Sustain the Global Arms Trade, has just authored an important new report, U.S. Military Support for Saudi Arabia and the War in Yemen (Center for International Policy, November 2018). Below is an excerpt of he Summary and Key Findings, we recommend reading the […]

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In an article published on September 20, 2018 by The Economist, “Why Europe should focus on its growing interdependence with Africa,” WPF’s Alex de Waal discusses the shared space of the Mediterranean, between Europe and Africa. The full article is available on their website; below is an excerpt.

The scramble for Europe

There […]

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This month’s Employee of the Month comes to us via Annie Fairchild and Catriona Murdoch, both of our partner organization, Global Rights Compliance.

In light of the unanimous adoption of UNSC Resolution 2417, September’s Employee of the Month is Starvation, and specifically those political and military leaders who have continued to utilise starvation as […]

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With admirable clarity, our colleague Tom Dannenbaum outlined how international criminal law might apply to starvation during his presentation in our conference The Return of Famine. In case you missed it, below is a video and transcript of his remarks.

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On the anniversary of Meles Zenawi’s death six years ago, the WPF has published a new Occasional Paper, “The Future of Ethiopia: Developmental State or Political Marketplace?” by Alex de Waal. In it, de Waal notes that “Today’s changes in Ethiopia are rapid, confusing and disruptive. They promise openness and democratization, but also contain perils. Like many […]

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