Currently viewing the category: "Human Rights and Justice"

Today, the WPF is launching a new research project tracking COVID 19 in places of detention, with focus on the United States. Our first case study, of Massachusetts, is now available. The project is led by WPF Research Director, Bridget Conley, and draws on a team of Tufts University-affiliated researchers.

Beginning in […]

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Whether the goal is to minimize coronavirus transmission across society, to protect detained people who are at heightened risk, or to improve the criminal justice system, we need to learn both to see the larger contours of Detentionville and the extreme variations within it. It is simultaneously national and local. While the affects of detention are not borne equally by all, the pandemic also reveals that we all live near Detentionville.

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Anthropological research has often been predicated on the fantasy that research has a beginning and an end, determined by the presence of the anthropologist in “the field” (horrible phrase). But when you are writing about where you are living, there is, of course no beginning and no end, and so defining the parameters of the research requires greater clarity about why those parameters are being imposed.

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This interview is part of a series, speaking with researchers whose previous work has been on international issues and who are now focusing on issues within the United States. Bret McEvoy is a doctoral candidate at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts University).  His research looks at why and how dominant racial and […]

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Writing for the BBC, Alex de Waal argues that both Sudan and the ICC might prefer a slowdown. Originally published on the BBC website on 14 February 2020.

Sudan’s announcement that it plans to hand ousted long-serving President Omar al-Bashir over to the International Criminal Court (ICC) was dramatic and surprising, but it […]

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Bashir to The Hague?

On February 11, 2020 By

The announcement by the Government of Sudan that it intends to hand over former President Omar al-Bashir and three other individuals to the International Criminal Court is dramatic, surprising, and welcome to the vast majority of people in Sudan who long for justice. But it is also problematic.

Accountability for crimes committed over the last […]

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