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Bashir to The Hague?

On February 11, 2020 By

The announcement by the Government of Sudan that it intends to hand over former President Omar al-Bashir and three other individuals to the International Criminal Court is dramatic, surprising, and welcome to the vast majority of people in Sudan who long for justice. But it is also problematic.

Accountability for crimes committed over the last […]

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This interview is part of a series, speaking with researchers whose previous work has been on international issues and who are now focusing on issues within the United States. Alex Hinton is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights, and UNESCO Chair on Genocide Prevention […]

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Today, states gathered in the Hague, at the 18th Assembly of State Parties to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court made a historic decision: they voted unanimously to make starvation a war crime in non-international armed conflicts. The vote came in the form of an amendment to the Rome Statute, tabled by Switzerland […]

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WPF is thrilled to announce that that Assembly of State Parties to the International Criminal Court has unanimously amended the Rome Statute to include the war-crime of starvation in a non-international armed conflict. Below is a press release from Global Rights Compliance, our partners in the Accountability for Starvation project, reporting on the […]

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Our partners in the Accountability for Mass Starvation project, Global Rights Compliance, are hosting an important event today regarding a possible amendment to the Rome Statute. More information is below.

This Saturday the 7th of December at the 18th Session of the Assembly of State Parties (ASP) to the Rome Statute, […]

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Starvation isn’t at the core of these malign political developments. But it’s clear that xenophobia, corruption and dishonesty are the enemies of humanitarian action and advocacy in the short term, and in the longer term they will impede sustained action to mitigate climate crisis and its traumas. The people who are deprived of what is indispensable for sustaining life, whether in Yemen or South Sudan, in refugee camps in Bangladesh or in detention facilities on the U.S.-Mexico border, are not only the victims of starvation crimes in need of our aid and advocacy, but are the wind chimes that warn of approaching storms.

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