Currently viewing the tag: "Africa"

Earlier this week, on August 27th, we launched a new occasional paper, Introducing transnational Conflict in Africa dataset. Today, we are publishing a memo, Implications of the TCA that highlights policy implications of the core research finding: existing datasets have systematically under-represented the level of transnational political violence (covert war, militarized disputes, support […]

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A new occasional paper by Alex de Waal, Pax Africana or Middle East Security Alliance in the Horn of Africa and the Red Sea? examines the peace and security challenges facing the Horn of Africa in the context of assertive military and political engagement from the Arabian Peninsular.

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For the last 25 years, Somalis and international interlocutors concerned with state-building appear to have assumed that ‘clans’ are the core identity units in Somalia, bonded by primordial ties. However, the prevalent formula that redefines selected corporate lineage aggregations as political-territorial identity units is a historical contingency that needs to be explained.

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In an article published on September 20, 2018 by The Economist, “Why Europe should focus on its growing interdependence with Africa,” WPF’s Alex de Waal discusses the shared space of the Mediterranean, between Europe and Africa. The full article is available on their website; below is an excerpt.

The scramble for Europe

There […]

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For the Middle Eastern states, the Horn is a second or even third order priority, well below their concerns with Iran, Iraq, Syria and Yemen. In fact, their interest in Africa is an offshoot of these higher concerns. They do not treat African states as equals, not least because African leaders tend to ask for money when they visit. The African Union has come to recognise that it needs an external policy for the “shared space” of the Red Sea. But it approaches the Middle East from a position of relative weakness. The most dramatic illustration of such an imbalance was Libya in 2011 when the Arab states and NATO brushed aside an African Union initiative for a negotiated solution to the war.

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The presidential speech is a special artform. One of the things that makes it unique is that the speaker has to address several different audiences at the same time, such as a legislature, a domestic public, a political party, and international peers. Africa has a lot of presidents and they make a lot of speeches, […]

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