Currently viewing the tag: "arms trade"

For its storied history of corruption charges, including criminal and civil offenses across multiple jurisdictions, this months’ EOM is the defense company Leonardo SpA, previously called Finmeccanica. The nomination comes to us by way of our colleagues at Corruption Watch UK and their latest report, “The Anglo-Italian Job: Leonardo, AgustaWestland and Corruption Around the World.” We reprint the Executive Summary and encourage you to read the full Report.

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Our latest report from the Global Arms Business and Corruption program is “Corruption in the Russian Defense Sector” by Polina Beliakova and Sam Perlo-Freeman. As the authors note in the Conclusion,

While corruption can be considered a core element of the Russian political system, which is in many ways designed to put the […]

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For the seventh consecutive year, SIPRI’s data on military expenditure worldwide shows ‘not much change’ in the world total – but many of the signs point to a renewed surge in years to come. Their fact sheet reviews some of the key trends in the data.

The world total for 2017 is estimated to be $1,739 […]

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In this short video, Sam Perlo-Freeman, Project Manager for the Global Arms Business and Corruption project explains who is arming actors in the war in Yemen and what should be done about it. [3:43]

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In this video, [ 2.30 mins.] Vijay Prashad, journalist, historian and director of Tricontinental Institute for Social Research, discusses the flow of weapons from ‘friends’ to ‘enemies’ across today’s war zones. [Produced by World Peace Foundation with Corruption Watch, original footage produced for Shadow World]

Learn more about WPF’s project on corruption and the global arms trade, […]

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The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) released its latest data on the international arms trade on Monday 12th March. The data show a continuing growth in the global trade in major conventional weapons, with the volume of transfers from 2013-2017 being 10% higher than it was over 2008-2012.

SIPRI arms trade data […]

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