Currently viewing the tag: "arms trade"

I was supposed to be giving a presentation on this subject as part of a panel organized by Economists for Peace and Security at the American Economic Association conference in Philadelphia last Saturday. Winter Storm Grayson put paid to that plan, so instead I thought I’d write about it here.

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WPF has published “Corruption in the Indonesian arms business: tentative steps towards and end to impunity (December 2017)” authored by Xiaodon Liang and Sam Perlo-Freeman.  This paper emerged out of research from our program on Corruption and the Global Arms Trade.

From the Introduction:

The arms trade is one of the most corrupt legal […]

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This post originally appeared on the Forum on the Arms Trade’s Looking Ahead blog.

This month, the Swedish Parliament is expected to vote on a government proposal to strengthen Swedish arms export controls, among other things by adding a “democracy criterion,” that will require a recipient state’s democratic status to be taken into […]

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“But the jobs!” – the go-to cry for many people in response to objections to the activities of the arms industry. The popular myth that the arms trade is a crucial source of jobs and prosperity is regularly trotted out to defend arms sales to dictatorships and countries at war, such as the continuous […]

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In the first part of this article, I explained why it is difficult to estimate the total annual financial value of the global arms trade. In part 2, I explore in greater detail the challenges associated with various national context and focus on assessing the record of the world’s number one arms trader: the […]

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NB: this topic is discussed at greater length, with more details on the methodology used to obtain an estimate, in an occasional paper now available on the WPF website.

The question sounds straightforward, but the answer is anything but. Available data on the financial value of the international arms trade is extremely poor, such […]

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