Currently viewing the tag: "arms trade"

I was supposed to be giving a presentation on this subject as part of a panel organized by Economists for Peace and Security at the American Economic Association conference in Philadelphia last Saturday. Winter Storm Grayson put paid to that plan, so instead I thought I’d write about it here.

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WPF has published “Corruption in the Indonesian arms business: tentative steps towards and end to impunity (December 2017)” authored by Xiaodon Liang and Sam Perlo-Freeman.  This paper emerged out of research from our program on Corruption and the Global Arms Trade.

From the Introduction:

The arms trade is one of the most corrupt legal […]

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This post originally appeared on the Forum on the Arms Trade’s Looking Ahead blog.

This month, the Swedish Parliament is expected to vote on a government proposal to strengthen Swedish arms export controls, among other things by adding a “democracy criterion,” that will require a recipient state’s democratic status to be taken into […]

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Well, yes, we’re chasing the news a bit here. Paul Manafort may be a bad egg, but what has he got to do with world peace, you ask?

Well, for a start, he is an arms dealer among his many talents. Specifically, he connected French Prime Minister Edouard Balladur with his long-term friend and […]

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“But the jobs!” – the go-to cry for many people in response to objections to the activities of the arms industry. The popular myth that the arms trade is a crucial source of jobs and prosperity is regularly trotted out to defend arms sales to dictatorships and countries at war, such as the continuous […]

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In the first part of this article, I explained why it is difficult to estimate the total annual financial value of the global arms trade. In part 2, I explore in greater detail the challenges associated with various national context and focus on assessing the record of the world’s number one arms trader: the […]

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