Currently viewing the tag: "AU"

African leaders promised to “silence the guns” by 2020. Today, it is Africa’s voice for peace that is silent.

Just two decades ago, when the G7 leaders assembled, it was standard for Africa to be on the agenda, represented by an African leader who was forging a new partnership between a democratizing and developing continent […]

Continue Reading

Ethiopia’s Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed, who has so far resisted offers of mediation in the war in Tigray and entreaties to investigate growing allegations of war crimes and crimes against humanity associated with it, pulled a surprise when he addressed the Peace and Security Council (PSC) of the African Union (AU) on […]

Continue Reading

On 11 April 2019, the Sudanese army announced the overthrow of the government of President Omar Hansen Al Bashir. It also declared the suspension of the constitution and the parliament and the establishment of a transitional military council that plans to govern the country for a period of two years. African Union (AU) Commission Chairperson, […]

Continue Reading

The Arab world’s rivalries aren’t driving the unfolding Sudanese drama. But these regional power games could soon play out within Sudanese politics, with each state backing its favored client with money and, perhaps even guns. Such an outcome could have the same calamitous results in Sudan that it has had in Libya and Yemen. The “troika” of countries that sponsored the north-south peace negotiations in Sudan 15 years ago—Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States—have been conspicuously absent during the protests and the coup.

Continue Reading

After hours of keeping the public waiting, the Sudan military made the long awaited announcement that the embattled long time President of the East African country has finally succumbed to the same pressure that catapulted him to power three decades earlier. Sudan has been under the grip of popular protests that began on 19 December […]

Continue Reading

It will be tempting for the United States, the United Nations and the African Union to congratulate General Ibn Auf on the overdue removal of Mr. Bashir and the promise of stability, and leave democratic change to news bulletins. That would be a mistake: The work of solving Sudan’s problems is only just beginning.

Continue Reading