Currently viewing the tag: "conflict"

WPF’s Bridget Conley and research fellow, Emma Soubrier, discuss issues from Dr. Soubier’s research paper, “Weaponized storytelling à la française: Demystifying France’s narratives around its arms export policies,” (World Peace Foundation, April 1, 2022). Dr. Conley asks about how Dr. Soubrier’s previous positions within the French government and working with Airbus impact her investigation of […]

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The World Peace Foundation is pleased to announce the publication of “Weaponized storytelling à la française: Demystifying France’s narratives around its arms export policies” by Emma Soubrier (April 1, 2022). This is the fourth report from or program, “Defense industries, Foreign Policy and Armed Conflict,” sponsored in part by the Carnegie Corporation of New […]

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The World Peace Foundation is pleased to announce the publication of “On the Front Lines: Conflict Zones and U.S. Arms Exports,” by Jennifer Erickson (World Peace Foundation, March 23, 2022). Below is from the executive summary.

The US export control system was tasked in the 1970s with restraining arms supplies to regions of conflict […]

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by Saba Araya, Kiros Teklay and Saba Mah’derom

As the war in Ethiopia expands and gets closer to the capital city, we are living in fear. We fear for ourselves, our families, our neighbors, and our country.

With every passing week, the situation of Tigrayan civilians in Addis Ababa and across Ethiopia has become progressively […]

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The United Nations and almost every single foreign government concerned with Ethiopia has called for a ceasefire. But what does this actually mean? What is a ceasefire and how can it be secured?

This blog post explores some of the complexities of a ceasefire agreement (CFA). Ceasefire has no specific meaning in law, but […]

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Originally published by Responsible Statescraft on September 17, 2021.

Out of the headlines, the civil war in Ethiopia rages on. Thousands are dying in bloody battles between Tigrayan resistance fighters and the ill-trained recruits that the Ethiopian government is deploying to shore up its shattered army. More than 200 massacre sites have been documented in […]

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