Currently viewing the tag: "counter-terrorism"

September 11—or Meskerem 1—is Ethiopian New Year’s Day. At the stroke of midnight on September 10/11 2001, the Sheraton Hotel in Addis Ababa began a wonderful fireworks display, to rival any pyrotechnics in the world. I remember it vividly—and what happened in the hours that followed. This is a brief personal reflection on those momentous […]

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Fifteen years ago, when African leaders set up their own peace and security system within what later became the African Union, they tried to balance diplomacy and armed enforcement. In case of a conflict, they would hold negotiations with all parties; sending in peacekeeping troops would only be a fallback option. But Western countries like the United States and France have tended to favor military approaches instead. During the civil war in Libya in 2011, a panel of five African presidents, established by the African Union and chaired by Jacob Zuma of South Africa, proposed letting Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi go into exile in an African country and then setting up an interim government. But the plan was spurned by NATO, which preferred regime change by way of foreign intervention.

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