Currently viewing the tag: "Darfur"

Originally published by Foreign Affairs, September 18, 2023.

In 2003, mass atrocities in Sudan’s Darfur region shocked the world. A coalition of human rights organizations mobilized in response, accusing Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir and his Janjaweed militia of genocide. Although the United Nations did eventually dispatch troops to protect Sudanese civilians, the response was […]

Continue Reading

Like most contemporary wars, Sudan’s war cannot be reduced to a contest between two sides. It’s more complicated—and best understood in context of the history of the Sudanese state and its wars.

The Sudanese state was born two hundred years ago as an instrument for plundering an imperial periphery. Khartoum and its immediate environs became […]

Continue Reading

Testifying at the ICC

On April 22, 2022 By

The prosecution of Ali Abd al-Rahma ‘Kushayb’ at the International Criminal Court opened earlier this month. It is the first case in which an alleged perpetrator of mass atrocities inflicted during the Darfur war in 2003-04 is facing international justice. Hopefully it will not be the last.

For the first time at an ICC trial, […]

Continue Reading

Mulugeta Gebrehiwot Berhe & Sarah Detzner

This paper was produced as part of the Conflict Research Programme at the London School of Economics. Access the full report,

Continue Reading

The Darfur conflict arguably become more chaotic and less-intense since the initial outbreak of violence in 2003 and its height in 2003 and 2004. Even over the course of Jan 2008- July 2009, we see considerably decreases in the amount of lethal violence. Some one-time alliances had collapsed, raising serious concerns about the credibility of any agreement reached at the negotiating table.

Continue Reading

The dominant interventionist approach to peace and security in Africa by-passes the hard work of creating domestic political consensus and instead imposes models of government favoured by western powers. The emergent African methodology offers a chance to develop locally-rooted solutions too often sidelined.

Continue Reading