Currently viewing the tag: "Employee of the month"

Epidemic diseases cause massive human distress and can kill millions across the world. Viruses and disease, in and of themselves, rarely if ever cause conflict or repression. But the policies enacted by states during epidemics—both to try to control disease transmission and for other ulterior purposes—can be a threat to peace, democracy and human rights. We are seeing this across the world today.

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Competition remains high for 2020 employees of the month! However, one person was elevated above the others in recent days: Rush Limbaugh. His self-description captures the bombast: “the ‘Doctor of Democracy,’ is known as the pioneer of AM radio. Limbaugh revolutionized the media and political landscape with his unprecedented combination of serious discussion of political, […]

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The first week of the new decade has seen such a spate of outrages against world peace that it is remarkably difficult to chose a single candidate for the World Peace Foundation Employee of the Month. But there is a common thread among the leading candidates: they are all from the new, disruptive manifestation of […]

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December 2019 has proven to be highly competitive for our ‘employee of the month’ designation. We opened a poll in twitter to help us decide. Among the contenders a few weeks ago: Prince Andrew, for his entanglement with Jeffrey Epstein and rape of girls; Jeanine Áñez, new President of Bolivia, determined to […]

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While white male supremacy isn’t exactly new (read: modern global history), the rise of Donald J. Trump to the White House with his characteristically flagrant expressions of racism and misogyny has emboldened white and male supremacists in the United States to more openly embrace and act upon their far-right ideologies.  Since Trump’s election, hate groups […]

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Jacob Rees-Mogg MP, leader of the House of Commons, was pictured languidly taking a nap in the middle of the most momentous debate in the British Parliament for many decades. Rees-Mogg had earlier dismissed the motion for Parliament to take control of its agenda, to stop a no-deal Brexit, as “constitutionally irregular.” His idiosyncratic concept of parliamentarians’ role—in the current context—is to serve as the emissaries of the people who voted for Brexit.

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