Currently viewing the tag: "famine"

Today, states gathered in the Hague, at the 18th Assembly of State Parties to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court made a historic decision: they voted unanimously to make starvation a war crime in non-international armed conflicts. The vote came in the form of an amendment to the Rome Statute, tabled by Switzerland […]

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WPF is thrilled to announce that that Assembly of State Parties to the International Criminal Court has unanimously amended the Rome Statute to include the war-crime of starvation in a non-international armed conflict. Below is a press release from Global Rights Compliance, our partners in the Accountability for Starvation project, reporting on the […]

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World Peace Foundation is pleased to announce the publication of a new Occasional Paper, “Famine Early Warning and Information Systems in Conflict Settings: Challenges for Humanitarian Metrics and Response,” by Dan Maxwell. The paper is part of the Conflict Research Programme, of which WPF is a partner. Below is the Introduction:

Famine […]

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Cliffnotes on Fleeing Mass Starvation: What we (don’t) know about the famine-migration nexus

Famine is a demon of history; international migration is the new calamity. That’s the quick and dirty way to sum up the general unstated understanding of the two phenomena. Of course, for those of us who claim even a serious preliminary […]

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From the end of the Cold War until the mid 2,000’s, there had been a downward trend in the number of conflicts and conflict-related deaths. Alex de Waal’s concept of ‘famine crimes’ represents a singular and significant attempt to understand the reversal we are now seeing.[1] In drawing our attention to the procedural […]

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Starvation isn’t at the core of these malign political developments. But it’s clear that xenophobia, corruption and dishonesty are the enemies of humanitarian action and advocacy in the short term, and in the longer term they will impede sustained action to mitigate climate crisis and its traumas. The people who are deprived of what is indispensable for sustaining life, whether in Yemen or South Sudan, in refugee camps in Bangladesh or in detention facilities on the U.S.-Mexico border, are not only the victims of starvation crimes in need of our aid and advocacy, but are the wind chimes that warn of approaching storms.

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