Currently viewing the tag: "gender"

This essay is the last in our series, Fletcher Voices. WPF invited students at Tufts University’s the Fletcher School for Law and Diplomacy to submit short essays reflecting on the impact of coronavirus. Kudrat Dutta Chaudhary is a Gender Specialist dealing with Gender based violence asylum claims at the Law Office of Robert B. Jobe, […]

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The Trumpist “MAGA” slogan – and the racist, misogynist, nationalist fantasies that underpin it – make me more than ever conscious that, to understand and be effective here in the US, I must keep learning from the feminist analysts and activist thinkers in Iceland, Japan, Colombia, Syria, and India.

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While white male supremacy isn’t exactly new (read: modern global history), the rise of Donald J. Trump to the White House with his characteristically flagrant expressions of racism and misogyny has emboldened white and male supremacists in the United States to more openly embrace and act upon their far-right ideologies.  Since Trump’s election, hate groups […]

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By WPF’s female staff: Bridget Conley and Lisa Avery

We are, perhaps, late to joining the political outrage that erupted on May 15th when Gov. Kay Ivey signed into law HB314, the “Alabama Human Life Protection Act.” But we felt her signature of the draconian law elevated Ivey above the fray, made her a clear […]

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Even though Pakistani women artists must start acting more responsibly yet mainly it remains the State and government’s responsibility to provide and supply technology and digital solutions against virtual harassment of women artists enabling them to perform their job effectively and without mental stress. This misogyny led defaming and stigmatization by random individuals has to be blocked officially through all four pillars of the state. Policies need to be in place to control online trolls. Simultaneously, the government of Pakistan must clearly recognize that its women artists have a right to uphold their occupational identity without getting stigmatized in the process.

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As an Islamic Republic, Pakistan treats its women as responsible ‘individuals/adults’ liable to pay all government taxes on incomes, savings, investments and property. A Pakistani Muslim professional woman is not expected to hide behind her wali or male guardian (and /or chaperone) on this account and claim exemption from taxes. If the expectation that she be duty-bound and clear all dues to the State and Government of Pakistan is warranted than so is the expectation from the State and Government of Pakistan to be rights-bound and thereby safeguard women’s freedoms while protecting them against any forms of harassment in the real and/or virtual world.

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