Currently viewing the tag: "Global Arms Business"

Sam Perlo-Freeman is a Research Coordinator at Campaign Against Arms Trade and a Senior Fellow with the World Peace Foundation. Previously, he was a Senior Researcher at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), from 2007 to 2016. This interview is the first in a series highlighting the research team for the Defense Industries, Foreign […]

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WPF’s Bridget Conley interviews Xiaodon Liang about this new WPF published paper, “A typology of corrupt third-parties in the legal arms trade” (World Peace Foundation April 2020).

Drawing on WPF’s Compendium of Arms Trade Corruption, Liang developed a typology of third party actors in arms deals. In this video interview, Liang provides an overview […]

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WPF’s latest occasional paper presents new analysis based on our Compendium of Arms Trade Corruption, focused on the roles of third-parties in the legal trade. The author, Xiaodon Liang, is a Research Assistant in the Global Arms Trade and Corruption program at the WPF. He is also a PhD candidate at The Fletcher School […]

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The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) released its latest data on the international arms trade on Monday 12th March. The data show a continuing growth in the global trade in major conventional weapons, with the volume of transfers from 2013-2017 being 10% higher than it was over 2008-2012.

SIPRI arms trade data […]

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The ongoing war in Yemen is the source of one of the worst humanitarian catastrophes in the world today, with millions of Yemenis facing an imminent threat of famine, in addition to the 10,000 (as of January 2017) who have been directly killed by the fighting. All sides have committed major abuses of international humanitarian law, including indiscriminate attacks against civilians and civilian infrastructure. The war seems to be at a stalemate, and is becoming even more complex with recent fighting in Aden between UAE-backed southern separatists, and formerly-allied Saudi-backed forces loyal to the internationally-recognized ‘government’ (if Yemen can be said to possess such a thing) of exiled President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi.

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This is a lesson in recycling, that the United States government and defense industry have been slow to learn, and the result could look something like an arms race that the United States is waging with itself, in which it provides proxy groups or allies with arms and training. These proxy groups re-form and radicalize or the weapons fall into the hands of groups labeled as terrorists by the United States. In response, the United States invests large amounts of money in military technology to combat terrorism and provides yet more arms to groups that assist it in fighting terrorism globally.

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