Currently viewing the tag: "Human Rights"

By Chidi Odinkalu, Paulos Tesfagiorgis, Alex de Waal and Delia Burns

In March, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) established a joint investigation into alleged violations of human rights committed during the conflict in Tigray, Ethiopia. Controversially, the partner was the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission (EHRC). The decision has been heavily criticized […]

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The Massachusetts legislature is considering a bill that place a 5-year moratorium on building new prisons in the state. On June 20, 2021, the Joint Committee on State Administration and Regulatory Oversight held a hearing on the proposed legislation, inviting public testimony. I spoke — alongside impressive and often deeply moving testimony from around 50 […]

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On May 16th, 2021, dozens of Israeli aircrafts were involved in the bombing of what the Israeli air-force described as “homes and offices” of Hamas and Islamic Jihad in Gaza. This included two entire apartment buildings. The total number of people killed in the airstrikes in Al-Wihda street that night was 43; of them, […]

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Why is it important to have clarity and consistency in data, especially related to deaths? In the first instance, all people deserve dignity in death, no matter the situation or circumstances of dying. At the most basic level, their deaths count; and the accounting should be accurate. People who died while incarcerated were the under direct care and responsibility of the state. Because the state has claimed this responsibility, the lives – and deaths – of incarcerated people are of public concern. Further, these numbers are not overwhelming. There is no reason that the DOC should be unable to produce an accurate public record. Finally, while it has been extremely difficult to verify the accuracy of information released by the DOC on some matters, like testing and positive cases, the inaccuracies regarding deaths give credence to concerns that the overall data DOC has released on the COVID-19 outbreaks in Massachusetts’ prisons contains flaws.

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Michael Cox is the executive director of Black & Pink Massachusetts, and administrator of the Massachusetts Bail Fund. In this interview, he discusses how, after his experience of being incarcerated, he re-directed his focus towards advocacy for and with incarcerated LGBTQ and HIV/AIDs+ people.

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Michael Cox is Executive Director of Black and Pink — Massachusetts, an organization that aims “to abolish the prison industrial complex and liberate LGBTQ+ people and people living with HIV/AIDS who are affected by that system through advocacy, support and organizing.” He is also formerly incarcerated, an experience that grounds his activism […]

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