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In a briefing paper, “Movement towards accountability for Starvation,” published today by the World Peace Foundation and Global Rights Compliance, we review two key advances that occurred in 2018, and indicate areas where more work is required. Below is from the executive summary:

Can starvation be prosecuted? While international criminal law (‘ICL’) has become increasingly sophisticated […]

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At the outset of the war, it might have been reasonable to hope that pressure would force the Houthis to submit. Since it takes months to starve people, a brief period of hardship would not have involved a level of suffering disproportionate to the military objective. But, within months of the launch of the war, humanitarian agencies were warning of crisis, and there were no indications of Houthi surrender. By persisting with this method of war, Bin Salman knew for sure that thousands of Yemeni children would die from hunger and disease.

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This month’s Employee of the Month comes to us via Annie Fairchild and Catriona Murdoch, both of our partner organization, Global Rights Compliance.

In light of the unanimous adoption of UNSC Resolution 2417, September’s Employee of the Month is Starvation, and specifically those political and military leaders who have continued to utilise starvation as […]

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With admirable clarity, our colleague Tom Dannenbaum outlined how international criminal law might apply to starvation during his presentation in our conference The Return of Famine. In case you missed it, below is a video and transcript of his remarks.

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On July 11, 2018, Jane Ferguson’s article, “Is intentional starvation the future of war?” appeared in The New Yorker. Included in it is a quote from Alex de Waal and our colleague, Wayne Jordash, from Global Rights Compliance. Below is an excerpt. The full piece is available through the New Yorker.

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In partnership with Global Rights Compliance, the World Peace Foundation is today releasing a new briefing paper: Can we prosecute starvation?” The paper situates today’s famines as deriving from the manner in which states and non-state actors pursue armed conflict, reviews what law might apply to famine crimes, and discusses what evidence would be required […]

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