Currently viewing the tag: "peace"

Today, the UN Security Council members are expected to discuss the humanitarian crisis in Tigray.

It’s a matter for UN Security Council urgent business for several reasons.

First, it’s an internationalized crisis: there are over 45,000 refugees in Sudan and within weeks there could be three times that number. There are over 100,000 Eritrean […]

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When the World Food Program accepts the Peace Prize, they will need to be discreet. We can be more candid. Let’s name some names…

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This 11th of July marks-the 30th anniversary of the Declaration on the political and socioeconomic situation in Africa and the fundamental changes taking place in the world. Adopted by the Organization of African Unity (OAU) in Addis Ababa, the Declaration has been the bedrock of many of Africa’s normative and policy advances over the past three decades

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The World Peace Foundation stands with the African American-led movement demanding equality and justice and denouncing police brutality.

Throughout history, Black-led justice movements—some originating in the US, but also from within Africa and across the diaspora—have resisted oppression and injustice, and have inspired others to do the same. Today is no different.

Peace […]

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The World Peace Foundation’s ‘employee of the month,’ is an award bestowed on someone or something that contributes to keeping the Foundation in business. This is to say, the someone or something that hinders world peace.  Read more on the World Peace Foundation Employee of the Month.

On April 2, 2018, Abiy Ahmed was […]

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Starvation isn’t at the core of these malign political developments. But it’s clear that xenophobia, corruption and dishonesty are the enemies of humanitarian action and advocacy in the short term, and in the longer term they will impede sustained action to mitigate climate crisis and its traumas. The people who are deprived of what is indispensable for sustaining life, whether in Yemen or South Sudan, in refugee camps in Bangladesh or in detention facilities on the U.S.-Mexico border, are not only the victims of starvation crimes in need of our aid and advocacy, but are the wind chimes that warn of approaching storms.

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