Currently viewing the tag: "peace"

Water is stored, divided, cleaned, guided, reused, consumed, returned, delayed, degraded and cycled. Water puzzles humans in ways that that can test and grow our humanity. Water and irrigation interested Nobel Laureate Elinor Ostrom throughout her career. Water’s coaching of society’s early civilisations drew the attention of Karl Wittfogel. Water joins nations in treaties and brings together villagers in small associations. Yet water asks engineers, lawyers, economists, anthropologists to watch how nature and people actually use water (and other resources) without recourse to training and ‘disciplines’. I call people who closely and carefully rely on water for their living ‘waterists’.

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What we need to think about when we talk about water cooperation

Increased climate uncertainty, changing lifestyles and disparities in socio-economic development make finding solutions to water scarcity and water-related hazards significant. Today, there are both persistent and emerging water insecurities that can have major impacts on communities, nation-states and the natural environment. […]

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Intensifying water stress is one of the key trends of the 21st century. As scarcity of fresh water intensifies, many fear that conflict over water resources will emerge as a threat to world peace. However, leading experts highlight that historically the management of transboundary waters leads to cooperation instead of confrontation, directly opposing the proposal […]

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Although the US government has been signaling since 2010 that it intends to invest in modernizing its nuclear capabilities (beginning with the April 2010 Nuclear Posture Review Report) and modernization in Russia is well underway, the issue of nuclear modernization has recently captured the attention of major news outlets, with both The Economist […]

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Whether one engages with the goal of regime change for reasons of civilian protection or anti-authoritarianism, or a goal of maintaining the state in the name of respect for sovereignty and anti-terrorism, or some other form of rationalization, the effect is the same. The regime in Syria is despicable; ISIS is despicable–but there is a difference between removing the state and conceding ground to nihilist insurgents. The choice is not between friends and enemies, but the choice to de-escalate violence and shift opposition to a political (rather than military) plane, or to increase violence. And whatever the goal, it is important to ask at what point does continuing to feed the dynamic of violence become the worst option?

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The difficulty of ensuring international water security is that the reasonable, equitable and sustainable utilisation of international water courses has long been constrained by national sovereignty and security priorities. Transboundary water management is a wicked problem, with competing interests of agricultural uses, industrial development, environmental sustainability, water sanitation, hydroelectric energy production, etc.

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