Currently viewing the tag: "political marketplace"

by Jared Miller

A manmade humanitarian crisis is a tragedy, but for some, it is also a lucrative opportunity. As the crisis deepens prompting massive security and humanitarian spending, along with the increasing cost of rebuilding, for certain individuals, the ensuing crisis economy becomes more lucrative than the peacetime economy. While some benefit, millions suffer. […]

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By Eddie Thomas & Alex de Waal

Sudan’s food economy is broken and the generals in power have neither capability nor intent to mend it.

A generation of rural Sudanese have faced hunger even while the country exported food and urban dwellers enjoyed a diet centered on imported wheat. An inequitable social compact exploited the […]

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The planned shift to renewable energy will risk violence in fragile oil states.

Benjamin J. Spatz, Alex de Waal, Aditya Sarkar; Tegan Blaine

Research described in this article was funded by a USIP grant and conducted by the World Peace Foundation’s “Decarbonization and Peace in Fragile States” project. The […]

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The COVID-19 pandemic will, it is feared, bring about the most severe global recession for decades. It will also restructure the global economy. Some of these dynamics are already clear in the U.S., where big corporations with political influence in Washington DC are salivating at the prospect of being able to gobble up a bigger […]

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In the countries where the Conflict Research Programme conducts research, democracy activists and external actors (we use the catch-all term ‘policymaker’ in this blog) usually have multiple goals. They want to end armed conflict, build governance institutions (once conflict ends), reform the security sector, and promote democracy and justice. Since these goals are extremely […]

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Theories of change are essential components of development programming. Yet they are often the last to be developed in the programme cycle – an afterthought to justify activities which have already been planned or to satisfy donor imperatives. This policy memo by Alex de Waal, Aditya Sarkar, Sarah Detzner and Ben Spatz, refocuses attention on the theory of change as a first step to thinking about how and why we think certain actions and strategies will produce desired change or achieve specific policy outcomes.  

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