Currently viewing the tag: "sanctions"

This essay aims to shed light on the link between sanctions and food insecurity, an understudied subject in the Syrian context, and to contribute to available knowledge on the subject in general.

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Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok is in Washington DC seeking U.S. help in assisting the civilian-led government deal with the deepening economic crisis that threatens to unravel that country’s democratic revolution. Hamdok was appointed in August in the hope that U.S. will take long overdue steps to lift comprehensive sanctions and thereby set a path […]

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The sanctions were maintained because the Sudanese government has an extremely poor record on human rights and democracy. But if sanctions are to serve as any kind of incentive for the government to change its behavior, they will only work if they are credible—that is, if they are lifted when the government does what is asked of it. If the sanctioning country changes the criteria every time the sanctions come up for review, they cease to be an instrument of policy and simply become a signal of condemnation.

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