Currently viewing the tag: "Sudan"

Mulugeta Gebrehiwot Berhe & Sarah Detzner

This paper was produced as part of the Conflict Research Programme at the London School of Economics. Access the full report,

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The Covid-19 pandemic has transformed or intensified ‘remote’ forms of working.  Like for much of the world’s population, the mobility of aid workers has become restricted and so have the possibilities of distributing material or in-kind aid.  At the same time, humanitarian crises and the need for aid will increase; including not only include health […]

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Twenty years ago, Yoanes Ajawin, one of the co-directors of Justice Africa, began compiling what he called the ‘Literature of Accord’ for Sudan: a record of all the agreements entered into by the Government of Sudan, opposition parties and rebel groups, and civil society. The first edition was circulated in […]

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Theories of change are essential components of development programming. Yet they are often the last to be developed in the programme cycle – an afterthought to justify activities which have already been planned or to satisfy donor imperatives. This policy memo by Alex de Waal, Aditya Sarkar, Sarah Detzner and Ben Spatz, refocuses attention on the theory of change as a first step to thinking about how and why we think certain actions and strategies will produce desired change or achieve specific policy outcomes.  

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Writing for the BBC, Alex de Waal argues that both Sudan and the ICC might prefer a slowdown. Originally published on the BBC website on 14 February 2020.

Sudan’s announcement that it plans to hand ousted long-serving President Omar al-Bashir over to the International Criminal Court (ICC) was dramatic and surprising, but it […]

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Bashir to The Hague?

On February 11, 2020 By

The announcement by the Government of Sudan that it intends to hand over former President Omar al-Bashir and three other individuals to the International Criminal Court is dramatic, surprising, and welcome to the vast majority of people in Sudan who long for justice. But it is also problematic.

Accountability for crimes committed over the last […]

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