Currently viewing the tag: "Sudan"

Writing for the BBC, Alex de Waal argues that both Sudan and the ICC might prefer a slowdown. Originally published on the BBC website on 14 February 2020.

Sudan’s announcement that it plans to hand ousted long-serving President Omar al-Bashir over to the International Criminal Court (ICC) was dramatic and surprising, but it […]

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Bashir to The Hague?

On February 11, 2020 By

The announcement by the Government of Sudan that it intends to hand over former President Omar al-Bashir and three other individuals to the International Criminal Court is dramatic, surprising, and welcome to the vast majority of people in Sudan who long for justice. But it is also problematic.

Accountability for crimes committed over the last […]

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Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok is in Washington DC seeking U.S. help in assisting the civilian-led government deal with the deepening economic crisis that threatens to unravel that country’s democratic revolution. Hamdok was appointed in August in the hope that U.S. will take long overdue steps to lift comprehensive sanctions and thereby set a path […]

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The Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC) have hammered out a deal with the generals who took power after the fall of long-serving ruler Omar al-Bashir. They have agreed to a 39-month transitional period. During this time, Sudan’s ultimate authority will be a Sovereign Council of five civilians and five generals, with an eleventh member to chair it – initially a soldier, later a civilian. A technocratic government is being set up and an interim national assembly appointed. Negotiating the power-sharing formula was hard enough – solving Sudan’s deep-seated political and economic problems is going to be harder still. Newly-appointed Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok is under no illusions about the challenge he faces. He is not a politician. He is an economist, a technocrat who has spent the last decades in the African Development Bank and the UN Economic Commission for Africa.

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As Sudan’s military rulers and the pro-democracy coalition of Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC) resume their fraught negotiations over the composition of a civilian government, real power is being transacted according to a different logic—the political marketplace. A political marketplace analysis of Sudan is an important tool for democracy activists in Sudan to understand the power base of the forces they are confronting. Otherwise the leaders of the FFC risk finding themselves with formal responsibility for a political apparatus, which runs according to a set of logics they simply cannot control.

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The struggle in Khartoum today is not just between military rule and democracy, but over whether Sudan should be ruled by those from the historic center of power on the Nile River or by the people of the vast and underprivileged peripheries.

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