Currently viewing the tag: "Sudan"

Chidi Odinkalu & Alex de Waal

Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem, fearless and passionate advocate for Pan-Africanism and the liberation of the oppressed worldwide, regularly ended his speeches, or signed off his weekly ‘postcard’, with the slogan, ‘don’t agonize, organize!’ It was a favorite phrase of Abdul Rahman Babu, a luminary of the previous generation of African […]

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Sudan’s civil war is senseless but was forseeable. The prospect of street fighting in the national capital, comparable to Mogadishu in 1991 or Tripoli in 2012, was too awful to contemplate, especially given the reputation of the metropolitan Sudanese for restraint within their heartland. But any frank analysis of the logic of Sudanese politics pointed […]

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Sudan’s war-makers refuse to learn from history. Time and again they seem to believe, despite every piece of evidence from the country’s sorry history of conflict and destruction, that using force will solve their problems. I have listened to Sudanese generals, politicians and rebel commanders, explaining why war is unavoidable, or necessary, or even desirable. […]

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This paper explores the consequences of Sudan’s experience with traumatic decarbonization and how this informs thinking on the durability of systems of monetized political governance: political marketplaces.

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Aditya Sarkar & Alex de Waal

Ethiopia and Sudan share a common border, the Blue Nile, and political and economic challenges ranging from separatism to chronic food insecurity. Both states nearly collapsed at the cusp of the 1990s. Yet they are rarely compared in academic or policy literature — despite a thought-provoking contrast in their […]

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The United Nations has announced a plan to alleviate world hunger and prevent famine. If the steps are implemented they may ease global food prices. But they won’t stop today’s famines, most of which are deliberately inflicted in the course of war.

Addressing man-made starvation needs political courage—and UN Secretary General António Guterres isn’t showing […]

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