Currently viewing the tag: "Yemen"

Mass starvation is a white-collar war crime. When there’s a man-made famine (the gendered language is deliberate–we have yet to witness a women-made one), there can be no excuse that the deprivation was perpetrated in the heat of the moment, or by rogue elements acting beyond orders. This is the case in Yemen today: four […]

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Just Security today ( Sept. 19, 2019) published a new blog essay by Ilya Sobol and Margherita Stevoli (who is a partner in our project Accountability for Starvation, with Global Rights Compliance). It offers insightful analysis of the recent bombing of Saudi Arabian oil facilities, and we cross-post it below.

As was reported over […]

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The WPF with Global Rights Compliance (GRC), partners in the project “Accountability for Starvation: Testing the Limits of the Law,” have published a series of memos documenting how existing international law might apply to starvation conditions, and why it should be applied to Syria and South Sudan. Today we publish our third […]

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Just over a year ago, I wrote an article, ‘Who is arming the Yemen war? (And is anyone planning to stop)’, surveying arms supplies to the conflict parties. This article updates the information with the latest available data, including the most recent edition of the SIPRI Arms Transfers Database, released on Monday 11 March.

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The history of twenty-five years of international criminal tribunals suggests that few culprits of starvation crimes would be indicted and fewer still tried and convicted. Even a successful prosecution would be mostly symbolic, as most perpetrators would escape. But this should not discourage us. Criminalizing starvation has many ramifications. It allows us to shift the shame of starvation from the victim to the perpetrator, to explore restorative justice including reparations, and to develop guarantees of non-recurrence.

The ultimate objective isn’t putting a villain in jail, but making the infliction of starvation so morally toxic that it is unthinkable.

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The diversion (a.k.a. stealing, manipulation) of food aid by the Houthis in Yemen is suddenly getting a lot of press. The detailed investigation by the Associated Press documents abuses on both sides, but most press coverage (ex: The Guardian) has focused on the allegations against the Houthis. The World Food Programme alleges that all […]

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