Reporting a Bias Incident

What is a bias incident?

Examples Of Bias And Hate Incidents:
Defacing signs by using slurs or negative images associated with group identity, graffiti, verbal epithets, or violent acts that target a person or community based on race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, disability, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity and expression.

Differences Between Hate Crimes And Bias Incidents:

  • Bias Incident – any act directed against a person or property that includes the use of slurs or epithets expressing bias on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, disability, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity and expression.
  • Hate Crime – a hate crime is a criminal offense expressing those same biases.

If you experience a bias incident or harassment or know someone who has:

  • Contact TUPD at x6-6911 (617-627-6911)
  • Contact the Residential Assistant on duty.
  • Contact the Bias Response Team at x7-3158 (617-627-3158)
  • Report Online via WebCenter

It is Tufts’ goal to be a welcoming community for all students, whatever their individual identity.  This summary of incidents of bias reported to University officials for the above period is a reminder that we have not yet achieved that goal.  This report is intended to be comprehensive, but only reported incidents are included; so what follows may not fully reflect the experience to which members of targeted groups are subjected.  We urge members of the community to report all incidents and to suggest ways to improve the usefulness of this summary.

BACKGROUND
An informed awareness of the climate on campus is an essential part of Tufts’ efforts to create a supportive academic, residential, and professional environment for our diverse population of students, faculty, and staff.  To this end, the University has in place a reporting system by which members of the campus community may report incidents in which they or other members of the community have, in their opinion, been targeted on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, disability, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity and expression.  Such incidents may but do not always include the use of slurs, derogatory language, or negative images.  Incidents may include chalking, graffiti, images, written messages, the defacement or alteration of signs, posters, verbal epithets, and violent acts.

REPORTING
When a report of such an incident is received by the Associate Dean of Students, Marisel Perez (Dean of Student Affairs Office), she consults with the other members of the Administrative Contact Team (Margery Davies, Director, AS&E Office of Diversity Education and Development; Michael Baenen, Chief of Staff, Office of the President).  For the most part, all reported incidents of bias will be included on a list of “Reported Incidents of Bias” that is available to the Tufts community on the Medford Campus via WebCenter (see below). The list of Reported Incidents of Bias does not include anonymous phone calls, anonymous e-mails, reports of material that appears in student publications, or reports of incidents that occur in classes.

The Administrative Contact Team will include any incident that could reasonably be seen to target a person or community based on race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, disability, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity and expression.  The Administrative Contact Team will edit reports to maintain confidentiality and to ensure that the language conforms to the protocol developed by the Administrative Contact Team (for example, certain epithets will not be repeated in their entirety).  As much as possible of the original language of the report of an incident will be preserved.

To Censor or not to Censor
We debated whether to repeat the actual words used in the incident, concerned both by their crudeness and by their capacity—even in this context—to inflict pain.  Finally, we decided to include edited versions, since the intent of this summary is to convey not only the occurrence but also the hurtful content of incidents of bias to those who may never experience such incidents directly.

Dealing with Graffiti
The protocol for dealing with graffiti is first to inform the police, who then photograph the graffiti.  After photographs are taken, Facilities is notified and treats the removal of graffiti as a priority.

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