Moreno Ocampo: Ma’aliya are Janjaweed

I asked Moreno Ocampo for clarification as to whether the Ma’aliya were indeed Janjaweed. He didn’t duck the question or say that his memory on this detail might have failed him. Rather, he insisted that yes they were Janjawiid and he had the evidence. When I pointed out that no literature on Darfur had ever, anywhere, made this claim, he dug his heels in and insisted that the details were confidential.

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Kabila: Release the Congolese Activists

I would like to introduce you to Sylvain Mbiye (Mushiba) Saluseke. He is the husband of a friend of mine, and a Congolese civil society activist. I introduce you to him because he has been detained without charges by Congolese security services in Kinshasa since March 17. His plight is both personal and historic. It is, of course, deeply painful for his family and loved ones, and it is also a small thread in the unraveling political story in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The longer he is detained, the worse is the fate of the country’s future. This is true not because of anything that Saluseke himself might have done or might yet do; rather, it is true because his continued detention serves as warning of how the government will act as the elections of 2016 approach.

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The Subjects of Mass Atrocities: Victims or Survivors?

While those killed in war are described as ‘victims,’ those who experienced torture, sexual violence, kidnapping, or witnessed atrocities without having experienced physical violence directly are often described as ‘survivors.’ Language matters not only because it seeks to represent acts of violence, but also because it has the capacity to accord agency to – or diminish the agency of – those affected by the violence. Yet, ‘victim’ and ‘survivor’ are often insufficient terms for capturing the varied and layered experiences of violence.

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Informe ¡Basta Ya!: ¿pasos hacia la construcción de la paz en Colombia?

El impacto del conflicto armado que vive Colombia desde hace más de 50 años, aun tiene capítulos de los cuales las y los colombianos y el mundo no conocemos. Sin embargo, el Informe ¡Basta Ya! Colombia: memorias de guerra y dignidad, realizado por el Centro Nacional de Memoria Histórica[1] es un aporte valioso en la dirección correcta: narrar la verdad sobre las graves violaciones ocurridas en Colombia; develar la acción de todos los actores del conflicto, sus intereses y vínculos con las élites políticas y sociales en Colombia; rescatar la memoria de las víctimas y la persistencia de su sufrimiento; mostrar las políticas judiciales, gubernamentales y administrativas dirigidas a imponer justicia sobre el muro de impunidad existente; y recomendar medidas concretas para la superación de estos problemas.

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“Basta Ya!”: On the Colombian Center for Historical Memory Report

The account of armed conflict that has affected Colombia for more than 50 years still has chapters that are unknown to Colombians and the world. However, the report “Enough Already! Colombia: Memories of War and Dignity,” created by the National Center for Historical Memory [1], is a valuable step in the right direction and it serves a number of purposes: narrating the truth about the [most?] severe violations that have taken place; revealing the activities of all actors in the conflict, as well as their interests and links to national political and social elites; capturing the memory of the victims and the persistence of their suffering; highlighting judicial, administrative and governmental policies to begin to use judicial mechanism to create cracks in the wall of impunity; and recommending concrete measures to overcome these problems.

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