PROTECTING VULNERABLE GROUPS

Over the course of the twentieth century, one of the most dramatic changes to the concept of peace was the idea that it must include the experiences of civilian populations, not just interstate relations. One outcome of this shift was the development of a civilian protection paradigm, that has both made significant contributions and been sorely tested. A key challenge today is applying a critical lens to the politics and activism around protection policies, with the goal of invigorating new approaches.

Detentionville: Covid-19 in American prisons and jails

Places where people cannot enact social distancing are reporting significantly higher rates of Covid-19 infection than among the general public. One of the contexts where people are at elevated risk is detention. Nowhere is the problem more acute than in American prisons and jails.

Children and Youth Staying Safe in Conflict

Dyan Mazurana’s WPF funded project, `We Have Hope’: Resilience Among Violence Affected Youth, draws on her more than two decades of working with children and youth in conflict-affected areas. She invites readers to slip behind the statistics that often dominate our understanding of ‘children in conflict,’ and to hear what these young people have to say.

Famine and Mass Starvation: research and accountability

Mass starvation today results from political and military leaders’ policy decisions: starvation intentionally inflicted upon entire civilian populations. The key challenge for ending mass starvation is to render such policies and the leaders who choose to deploy them morally toxic. Could international criminal law be harnessed towards this overall goal?

Dignity for the dead: ‘In their presence’

Human bones connected to injustice expose questions about what it means to be human and the experience of an irreducible “presence” that occurs when viewing another person’s remains. This project aims to formulate ethical and practical guidelines for the display of these particular types of remains in museum contexts. In collaboration with Tisch College Program for Public Humanities.

Past Projects

Memory from the Margins

This project focused on how memorialization of mass violence might contribute to emerging democratic practices. The centerpiece is Bridget Conley’s study of the Red Terror Martyrs Memorial Museum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

How Mass Atrocities End

The project offered the first comprehensive cross-case study of patterns of mass atrocity endings. Arguing that there is much to learn about preventing and responding to new threats of atrocities through the process of examining how past instances ended, the project traced patterns through in-depth qualitative studies and a dataset of over 40 cases of atrocity endings since 1945.

Remembering the Ones We Lost: Support for South Sudanese efforts to document the names of people who died in conflicts since 1955. The project, Remembering the Ones We Lost was spearheaded by an independent group of South Sudanese civil society actors, and WPF issued them a grant to create a website that also serves as their informational infrastructure.

The Memory of Genocide and its Consequences in Cyangugu (Rwanda): This project was supported by the WPF and undertaken by RwaBaho Platform, The Center for Interdisciplinary Research: Democracy, Institutions, Subjectivity (CRIDIS), at the Catholic University of Louvain Belgium, as they aimed to create and implement an online archive of testimonies of the 1994 genocide against Tutsis in Rwanda and its consequences in Cyangugu. The project aimed to contribute to knowledge and understanding with a detailed record of the atrocities in Cyangugu, and evidence of the consequences for the local community. 

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