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"Let Them Eat Dog" Response

on English 1 Expository Writing

by Anna Kasagawa

I did not think the content of the essay “Let Them Eat Dog” by Jonathan Safran Foer would be quite so literal. I think that proves Foer's point that eating dogs is a tabooed topic in our society. While reading, my first thought was the tradition in China to eat chow-chows. I was surprised to find that eating dogs was not entirely rare, and happened in other cultures. the more I read the essay, I found myself agreeing and not able to immediately find a counter-argument of why we logistically shouldn’t eat dogs. However, being a dog owner myself, I knew that I could never actually eat dogs. I think that they are pets in our current society, and that makes the idea a taboo. Foer himself pointed out that the French, the Spanish, and the Indians all loved a certain type of animal, and so they ate other animals. Our current situation is that we have dogs as pets, and we primarily eat chicken, pork, and beef. To change that mindset, would mean we have to change our entire system. Something would have to replace the hole for pets. Honestly, I am quite baffled at where Foer got this argument from, but I guess he is questioning our culture and the standards that humans have set for themselves. Ethics, traditions, and culture have changed in the past, so it’s possible that we do it again. I went on a cave tour in Fiji where the cannibals used to live, and it was interesting to see the remains of their methods and story as some parts remain the same. For example, there was an oven where they used to cook the white foreigners. The concept of an oven has not changed to this day, and the only difference is what we put inside. So I guess Foer’s idea has credibility in terms of the possibility to implement change. That is not to say that I ever will, or that people will come to accept that notion. 

"Let Them Eat Dog" Response

on English 1 Expository Writing

by Neil Spazzarini

Why is it so difficult to imagine this simple idea? Dogs are basically any another animal.  Under all the flesh, dogs look the same as cows, pigs, sheep, and all other animals.  Foer brings up an interesting answer to this strange question, in which he blames our disgust of eating dogs at the way our culture is.  He makes great comparisons as well, stating that cows, one of our nation's most popular form of meat, is considered sacred to Indian cultures.  This is extremely ironic as well because when most Americans ( myself very much included ) hear that Indians refuse to eat meat from cows, we simply laugh at them and say "They are missing out".  And I am sure that in India it is the same way when they hear that instead of eating dogs, we keep them and make them our companions for life.  I can imagine them thinking to themselves "There are people who refuse to eat dogs?  But instead keep them and FEED THEM??? How foolish can they possibly be?".  And it's true, it is a very foolish concept that just shows the ignorance in not just our culture, but in all of humanity.  Because imagine how many less people throughout the world would be hungry for days on end, if we just ate all the animals that were deemed edible? But like most concepts that are engraved in our society, there is little hope that this will ever change.  Unfortunately, i know that I will not change myself either.  Because even though Foer's argument makes sense,  and even if that recipe sounds delicious, every time that I look at a dog, I could not imagine eating it.

News & Views: An interactive graphic to track the current Ebola outbreak

on Great Diseases

by Desislava Raytcheva

The New England Journal of Medicine has published an interactive graphic to track the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The map contains information on past outbreaks too as well as basic description of the disease, how it spreads, etc. You can view the graphic on the NEJM website.  

Response to 'Let Them Eat Dog'

on English 1 Expository Writing

by Roza Ogurlu

Is it possible to eat everything that makes sense to eat? In his essay ‘Let Them Eat Dog’ Foer argues that eating dogs is rational because of ecological reasons. However, eating dogs is a very controversial issue in most of the world. Many cultures regard dogs as companions and choose not to eat them. The main question to pose here is should the society focus on the benefits of eating dogs and overcome the taboos? Foer’s essay suggests that dog meat has a high protein content which can be beneficial for people who can’t find meat or can’t afford meat from grass based farming. Instead of euthanizing the dogs, the appropriate establishment therefore can send them to factories where they will be killed painlessly and sent to families who don’t have meat. This argument is very logical. However, these people may choose not to eat dogs, because eating dogs is repulsive to them. No one can compel them to eat something that don’t want to eat just because it’s the logical thing to do. Making someone to eat dog meat is like pressuring a vegetarian to eat meat. Although not eating a dog is a societal taboo unlike vegetarianism which a person chooses by his own will, in either of these cases making a person do something that they don’t enjoy is wrong. Governments can initiate a dog meat industry for people who can handle eating dog meat. However, people who don’t want to eat dog meat for ethical reasons shouldn’t. Therefore, like many other things in life, eating dog meat or eating meat in general is a personal choice. Likewise, people can eat snails, bugs, and horse if they want to.

"Let Them Eat Dog" Response

on English 1 Expository Writing

by Mary Gusentine

At first glance, I was a bit disgusted at the thought of eating a dog. I can’t begin to imagine roasting up one of my pets unless it was the apocalypse. But it is interesting to think about why we value certain animals more than others. I think this has a lot to do with the evolution of civilizations, the environments people in which people live, and the practicality of using one type of animal for food over domesticating another one. For example, cats and dogs are staples in authentic Chinese cuisine as opposed to the Chinese food we are familiar with in the U.S. These meats became staples as a result of poverty and lack of food during rough parts of Chinese history. The environment can have a large factor in what types of meat people consume. I have no knowledge about the logistics of hunting in colder climates vs. warmer climates so these are my assumptions. People living in a colder climate may be more inclined to hunt larger animals because they are able to preserve it well with the cold and the cold prevents them from hunting often. In contrast, people living in a warmer climate might want to catch smaller game because it is harder to preserve in the heat and they could potentially hunt more often.  Additionally, eating a cow rather than a dog or horse can seem more practical.  A cow cannot do much for humans other than produce milk and meat. They are not as agile as dogs or horses so riding them or using them to hunt is out of the question. Foer’s article was very intriguing and I’m curious about what else is in his book Eating Animals. He definitely gave us some food for thought.