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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on October 19, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on October 13, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Museums in the News

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on October 6, 2014 in museums in the news |

Greetings!
Welcome to Museums in the News. Through this column, I hope to help all of us be a little more informed and aware of the general “buzz” of the museum industry, as it is covered in mainstream news outlets. I’ll pull together a handful of stories each month, and then turn it over to you to provide comments, draw connections, and levy thoughtful critiques.
All the best,
Abigail Zhang
M.A. student, Museum Education

 

In Washington, the Corcoran laid to rest in peace
http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/an-empty-tomb-former-corcoran-staffers-hold-funeral-for-museum/2014/09/27/4cbab02a-4688-11e4-9a15-137aa0153527_story.html?tid=hpModule_d39b60e8-8691-11e2-9d71-f0feafdd1394

In Chicago, the Field Museum hosts “show and tell”
http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/09/27/field-museum-holds-its-first-ever-identification-day/

NPR tells the story of art forger Mark Landis
http://www.npr.org/2014/09/27/351738720/art-craft-explores-how-one-forger-duped-more-than-45-museums

California National Guard closes military museum due to missing artifacts
http://www.kcra.com/news/missing-artifacts-prompt-military-to-close-old-sac-museum/28264568

Kudos to the staff of the Quebec Museum of Civilization
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/quebec-museum-fire-quick-thinking-staff-saved-artifacts-1.2767763

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on October 6, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Announcement: Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Emerging Curator Competition

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on October 4, 2014 in job announcements |

The deadline to submit your entry is October 20, 2014 at11:59 PM ET.

In the spirit of Robert Rauschenberg, the jury seeks proposals that make unexpected connections and ponder new lines of questioning. In a career that spanned more than fifty years, Rauschenberg continually pushed the boundaries by using a multidisciplinary approach and defying expectation. His commitment to innovation and his fearless approach to art are characteristics that the jury will evaluate in the online exhibition proposals. Your exhibition proposal may include images of works from any of Artsy’s institutional partners and must include at least one work by Robert Rauschenberg.

Submission Instructions:

1. Go to Artsy.net and create an Artsy account if you don’t have one already.

2. Create an Artsy Post (see video “How to post on Artsy”). Paste in the text of your exhibition proposal, which may be no longer than 500 words total in English. Your online exhibition proposal may include up to 15 artworks selected from Artsy’s Institutional partners, see Institutions A-Z. No gallery or for-sale works may be included. Your online exhibition proposal must include at least one (1) artwork created by Robert Rauschenberg. (Need help finding content? See video “How to find content”)

3. Submit your exhibition proposal through the Official Entry Form.

4. The deadline to submit your entry is October 20, 2014 at11:59 PM ET.

5. Promote your submission via social media! Tag @Artsyand use the hashtag #EmergingCurator.

To be eligible for consideration, your entry needs to comply with all of the above guidelines.

Judges:

John Elderfield, Branden Joseph, Shirin Neshat, Christopher Rauschenberg, and Sarah Roberts. Judges will review submissions and announce three (3) finalists on November 11, 2014.

Public Voting:

Three (3) finalist exhibition proposals will be selected and featured on Artsy, and the public will vote via social media for the winner from November 11 to 14, 2014. Follow @Artsy on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+ for instructions.

Winner Announced: November 17, 2014

Eligibility:

The competition is open only to full-time or part-time undergraduate students, graduate students, and post-doctoral fellows who are at least eighteen (18) years old and are affiliated with an accredited college or university. Please see the Official Competition Rules for complete eligibility requirements.

For more information: https://artsy.net/post/robert-rauschenberg-foundation-robert-rauschenberg-foundation-emerging-curator-competition

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 29, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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What I did… right after my summer vacation

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 24, 2014 in The Wider World |

At the start of the semester, I did something I had never done before. I wrote my first computer game, and submitted it to my first virtual game jam. A game jam is a gathering of game developers working on games collaboratively or competitively — they are often held as all-night sessions in person, but they can also run for a longer period of time online, often a few weeks. I was because I have several friends who are game designers or otherwise active in the gaming industry, and for weeks, I had been hearing about a social media explosion called “gamergate.” Essentially, there has been a growing trend in video game culture for audiences to demand better representation of their own diversity and humanity in the games they play. A vocal and violent portion of the demographic that has stereotypically been thought of as the video game audience (white teenage boys and adult men who act like teenagers) object to these efforts. According to them, women, queer people, trans people, people of color, people who are interested in experimental game ideas, and more are “ruining” video games. A friend of mine decided to respond by running a jam called “Ruin Jam” dedicated to “celebrating the nonexistent demise of video games” — responding to the hatred with irreverence and creativity.

A whopping eighty-two games were created and submitted for Ruin Jam! I am very happy for my friend Caelyn, who ran it — it was the first jam she has run and promoted herself — and for those of us who participated, who included neophytes like me and experienced game designers. My game is just a preview of a full-length game I hope to write some day, but I’m pleased with it. I drew from a topic I explored in a paper for Material Culture class last semester, using personal objects to mitigate or sit with the fear of being forgotten. The excerpt of my game deals with a young family commissioning a set of lockets. You can play it here.

So, what’s this doing in my Wider World column, where I write about ways we as museum students can look at museums from diverse viewpoints?

There are several reasons I’m writing about this experience here:

- Games in museums are hot right now! I probably don’t have to tell you that, between the online Gaming in Education conference last week and today’s Lunch with NEMA about mobile games.

- I want to tell you about the game writing tool I used, because you may want to use it yourself! Twine is an open-source tool for writing text-based games, and you don’t need any coding knowledge to get started. You’re not going to create a blockbuster museum app on Twine, but you might create a simple choose-your-own-adventure story for your museum’s website or blog.

- The experience of the game jam was excellent. Some museums are already tapping into creative subcultures, whether it’s by hosting art nights or maker fairs. As inclusive as these events are intended to be, they are often only going to get to small niches of people… after participating in a loosely organized creative event like this one, I’m inclined to believe that’s an argument to have more creative subculture events (online, in museums, wherever!), not fewer. We need diversity and flexibility in order to reach people. I will probably develop my thoughts on creative subculture events at museums in another post, but hopefully, this post has gotten you thinking a little about the topic as well.

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 21, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Panel Discussion this Tuesday at the Mary Baker Eddy Library

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 19, 2014 in professional development |

Student Marie Palladino sent this announcement in. Thanks, Marie!

— A Panel Discussion and Presentation —

ARCHIVAL ACCESS ONLINE:

THE PROMISE, THE PROBLEMS, THE PAYOFF

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 @ 6:30 PM AT THE MARY BAKER EDDY LIBRARY

200 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., BOSTON | MBELIBRARY.ORG

A panel of experts will address such questions as:

• How is the digital revolution affecting historical research and the dissemination of information?

• What does this mean for all of us, amid increasing expectations for transparency and the immediacy

of accessing historical records and documents?

• Fast, cheap, and thorough—Can you have it all?

Panelists will present case studies:

DR. NEIL MANN (The New York Public Library), on digitizing significant literary manuscript collections

and making them available online.

NANCY HEYWOOD (The Massachusetts Historical Society), on opening up extensive digital resources

around prized collections, such as the Adams Papers.

DR. SHERRY DARLING (The Mary Baker Eddy Library), on launching the Mary Baker Eddy Papers online this

past January.

Moderator:

BETH LUEY, a leader in the field of documentary editing, has served as President of the Association

for Documentary Editing and related professional organizations. She is the author of Handbook for Academic

Authors, now in its fifth edition.

For more information, contact Jonathon Eder, Programs Producer: 617-450-7131 | ederj@mbelibrary.org

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 15, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Behind the velvet rope: Revealing process with museum tours and programs — guest post by instructor Ken Turino

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 14, 2014 in Uncategorized |

Tufts Instructor Ken Turino passed along this article he published last month on Public History Commons.

Public History Commons Editor’s Note: In “What I’ve Learned Along the Way: A Public Historian’s Intellectual Odyssey,” outgoing NCPH President Bob Weyeneth issued a call to action to public historians to include the public more fully in our work by “pulling back the curtain” on our interpretive process-how we choose the stories we tell. In this series of posts, we’ve invited several public historians to reflect on projects that do exactly that, assessing their successes and examining the challenges we face when we let the public in through the door usually reserved for staff.

Beauport, the Sleeper-McCann House, in Gloucester, Massachusetts is now interpreted as the home of a gay man.

As a public historian working in a museum, Robert R. Weyeneth’s call to “lift the veil” and bring the public into the interpretive process is welcome–and necessary if we want to broaden the kinds of stories we tell. As Jennifer Pustz writes in Voices from the Back Stairs, “the influx of academically trained historians on museum staffs and the subsequent influence of social history on exhibitions and interpretation have resulted in a broader definition of authenticity that can encompass the whole truth, warts and all, and the history of all Americans.” [1]

Why, then, are many museums and historic sites so reticent to explore diverse stories? Do they fear the public’s reaction? If so, why aren’t we involving the visitor more in the process of historical interpretation?

- Read the full article at http://publichistorycommons.org/behind-the-velvet-rope/#sthash.OmXhPsHs.dpuf

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The deadline for NEMA scholarships is September 19!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 14, 2014 in Uncategorized |

Don’t delay – the deadline for scholarships is fast approaching!

NEMA is pleased to offer several scholarship and fellowship opportunities to make the annual conference more financially accessible. Scholarship awards support travel, lodging, and three-day registration for individual members of NEMA and employees of NEMA institutional members.

The deadline for all scholarship programs is September 19, 2014.

Only one application is necessary to apply for all scholarships and fellowships. Note: Individual opportunities have slightly differing requirements in the essay portion of the application.

You will be notified of the final award decisions in early October. In the event that your application is unsuccessful, you may still register at the early-bird rate at any time before conference.

Click here for complete details including a scholarship application form.

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DATE CHANGE: Young professionals event at Old North Church October 1

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 10, 2014 in Uncategorized |

Erin Wederbrook Yuskaitis passed this along. Thanks, Erin! The NEW DATE of this event is October 1.

Do you live in Boston but have never visited the Old North Church on the Freedom Trail? Do you want to learn more about this nationally significant historic building in Boston’s favorite neighborhood? Perhaps you actually live in the North End but have never stepped inside! You are not alone. Lots of busy young professionals have not had time to explore every interesting historic site or museum in the city. So we invite you to come see what our exciting campus has to offer the local community. Over 500,000 tourists visit us every year, but we’d like to meet YOU!
Join the Old North Foundation staff and other local young professionals for a mix-and-mingle reception in our fabulous Washington Courtyard (weather permitting), explore the church and hear a brief overview about the architecture and Paul Revere’s famous midnight ride, and learn more about plans for our upcoming 300th anniversary. What better way to spend a lovely early fall evening?
Bring a friend or colleague – all are welcome!
Wine, beer, and appetizers provided. Afterward, dine at one of the many fantastic restaurants in the North End!

FAQs
Are there ID requirements or an age limit to enter the event?
Young Professionals are those 21-39 years of age. Sorry, you must be 21 to attend.

What are my transport/parking options getting to the event?
As always the best way to get here is on foot/public transportation. The closest T stops are the green and orange lines at Haymarket or the blue line at Aquarium.

Where can I contact the organizer with any questions?
Call Renie Pavilon at 617-523-6676 x105

Is my registration/ticket transferrable?
Sorry, tickets are not transferrable.
Have questions about Young Professionals Meet & Greet at the Old North Church? Contact Old North Foundation.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/young-professionals-meet-greet-at-the-old-north-church-tickets-12353873769

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 8, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on September 1, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on August 25, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on August 18, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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The Tufts Museum Studies blog is seeking new contributors!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on August 11, 2014 in blog news, professional development |
The Tufts Museum Studies blog is always open to new contributors, but as the new school year rolls around, we are actively recruiting. The blog is authored and managed by current students — alumni and experienced museum professionals are welcome to contribute guest posts.

Students, whether you are brand-new to Tufts this Fall or you’ve  been around for a while, consider writing a stand-alone blog post or a column. Columns can be weekly, monthly, you name it. You can work with others or on your own. If you prefer to create photo collages or some other media rather than writing, we’re open to that, too!

Feel free to browse the archives for inspiration. Here are some topics that have been covered on the blog in the past, but aren’t being covered on a regular basis now. You are welcome to pick up one of these and make it the theme of your own column or blog post, or start from scratch!

  • Museums in the News
  • Book reviews and recommendations
  • The future of museums
  • Interviews with museum professionals
  • Museum reviews
  • Science Museums — we haven’t had a column on history museums, art museums, or children’s museums before, but it would be welcome, too
If you are interested or have questions, contact Tegan at tufts.museum.blog@gmail.com or comment on this post.

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on August 10, 2014 in jobs listings, Uncategorized |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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The Wider World: How Do You Keep Up?

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on August 5, 2014 in The Wider World |
On my first day at Tufts, when all of the new students were sitting in the sweltering heat in the Gantcher Center, one of the speakers of our matriculation ceremony said to us, “From this point forward, you are behind.” He explained that in academia, there will always be more journal articles we need to read, lectures we need to attend, and so on, and that’s okay, and it will be that way our whole careers. He cautioned us not to get too far behind, but reminded us it is not a sign of failure if we are behind.
Optimistic words.
I find that in the parts of my Tufts life and professional life that aren’t part of “academia,” this may be even more true. Museums are constantly changing, and museum professionals are constantly trying new things and studying what works and what doesn’t.  How do you keep up? Well, I’m not an expert, but I am someone with a bit of practice at trying to keep up, so here are my tips.
  • Decide what you definitely don’t need to spend time reading. In my opinion, a blog post published on LinkedIn is  more likely than not a reach for internet clout on the part of the author, rather than a real contribution to a discussion. That just goes for the blog posts, however; LinkedIn discussion forums can be valuable.

 

 

  • Use social media to your advantage. I am going to scroll down my Facebook feed a couple times a day anyway, so it’s a good way to keep up with what’s happening at museums I care about and museum organizations that are doing cool work. Personally, I frequently find twitter overwhelming because there’s just so much there, but I follow all my favorite museums, NEMA, Museums Re:Blog, and others on Facebook, and then I get the short version of the news as it’s happening.

 

  • Keep track of blogs and other feeds with a feed aggregator (rest in peace, Google Reader). My current favorite is “The Old Reader.” It has the features I like, such as toggling between “show all” and “show unread,” and the option to mark something as read just by scrolling past it. It also has the option of using Spritz, a third-party speed-reading tool that I enjoy using occasionally. “Spritzing” mixes up my reading routine and helps me stay focused rather than letting my mind wander while I skim articles. The makers of Spritz also offer a bookmarklet so you can use their tool on any website; I have found it easier to use on some sites than others.

 

  • Whether it’s news in the field or something you’re reading for a class, it’s always a good idea to pay attention to how you are reading. Simple learning tricks such as reading the table of contents first, and reviewing chapters or sections  that are less important to you by reading the first and last few paragraphs, can go a long way to sorting through the massive amounts of information out there. I strongly recommend the modern classic How to Read a Book by Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren for an in-depth treatment of these and other strategies.

This post is geared towards keeping up with information by reading, partly because a large portion of media related to our fields is print-based, but also partly because I’m a fairly visual learner, and I’m much less likely to listen to a podcast or watch a video than I am to read a blog post. If you have tips for the audio-inclined, or any other thoughts on how you keep up, I encourage you to share them in the comments.

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on August 3, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on July 26, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Help out a NEMA session by taking this survey

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on July 22, 2014 in Uncategorized |

Do you have a few minutes to spare to help with the data behind a NEMA 2014 conference panel?

Tufts Alum Amanda Gustin is chairing a panel titled “The Graduate School Conundrum.” The panel will open with analysis of trends in museum graduate education, and in order to do that analysis we need your help!

Whether or not you have a degree, whether or not you currently have a museum job, we are hoping you’ll fill out the survey and tell us a little bit about your background and your thoughts.

Survey link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1JPVHLvpoh_oJX5vh6xEHgtia7W4qVk0_ViyY70grjKU/viewform

The data will be followed by a conversational debate between Tufts program director Cynthia Robinson and museum consultant Linda Norris (of The Uncataloged Museum blog).

Here’s the official session description:

As the museum field has continued to professionalize, museum studies, public history, and other similar graduate programs seem to multiply at an exponential rate. What’s going on? We’ll present information from a 2014 survey of museum graduates & museum programs, and then continue with a conversational debate between panelists about the state, practicality, diversity, value, and future of museum studies. We will also invite questions and feedback from the audience.

Look for the results and panel discussion at the 2014 NEMA Annual Conference in Cambridge this fall! (More info on the conference at http://www.nemanet.org/conference-events/conference/2014-conference/main/.

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Session proposals for the AAM Conference are now open!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on July 22, 2014 in conferences |

 

See http://www.aam-us.org/events/annual-meeting/sessions for details.

 Session Proposal Submission Opens        July 16
 Session Proposal Submission Deadline        August 25
 Session Acceptance/Non-Acceptance Sent        mid-November

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on July 20, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

Director [Columbus Museum] 

Assistant Curator – Arms and Armor [The Met] 

Curatorial Assistant [Cincinnati Art Museum] 

Senior Membership Manager [National 9/11 Memorial and Museum]

Exhibitions Coordinator [Asia Society Texas Center] 

Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs & Programs [Anchorage Museum] 

Photography and Image Rights Manager [Saint Louis Art Museum]

Director of Exhibitions and Design [Saint Louis Art Museum]

Education Specialist [Key West Art & Historical Society] 

Collections Manager [Iolani Palace] 

Exhibition Designer [The Met] 

Manager of Teaching and Learning [Brooklyn Historical Society]

Associate Collections Information Specialist [The Met]

Science Educator, Americorps Service Member [Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium] 

Head of Education [Connecticut Public Affairs Network - CT Old State House] 

Assistant Curator [Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum] 

Operations Manager and Assistant to the Director [Fuller Craft Museum]

Guest Curators (Volunteer) Unbound Visual Arts, Inc.

Curator of Furniture [Historic Deerfield]

Part-Time Museum Administrator [Gibson House Museum]

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Upcoming Symposium in Boston

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on July 20, 2014 in boston emps, professional development |

Recent Tufts alumna Lauren Reddy passed this announcement along. Thanks, Lauren!

Full-time student registration is $35, and there are a limited number of scholarships available.

NICHOLS HOUSE MUSEUM SYMPOSIUM

IN THE HOUSE AND ON THE WEB:
21ST-CENTURY STRATEGIES FOR INTERPRETING HISTORIC INTERIORS

The Boston Athenaeum, 10 1/2 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts
October 3, 2014 at 8:00 am – 3:30 pm

On Friday, October 3, five speakers from Europe and the United States will come together to share experiences from their museums and heritage sites which have successfully integrated technology into interpretations of their historic interiors and landscapes. From mobile applications to virtual recreations, learn from these 21st-century innovators and come away with cutting-edge ideas from museum professionals around the world. Please join us for this full-day event.

SPEAKERS:

Lee Glazer, PhD- Associate Curator, American Art, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC
Victoria Kastner – Historian, Hearst Castle, San Simeon, California
Annie Kemkaran-Smith – Curator (Art Collections) Down House, National Collections Group, London, UK
John A. Sibbald – Chairman, Virtual Hamilton Palace Trust, Hamilton, Scotland
Loic Tallon – Senior Mobile Manager, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

Telephone: 617.227.6993
Email: info@nicholshousemuseum.org

http://www.nicholshousemuseum.org/symposium_2014.php

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The Wider World: Design with the Public in Mind

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on July 16, 2014 in The Wider World |

by Tegan Kehoe

Have you seen the news? An activist group in London has begun pouring concrete over metal spikes that deter people from loitering and homeless people from sleeping in certain areas.. As it turns out, the field of designing to influence behavior is a pretty developed one. Designers install all kinds of features to make a space inhospitable to loitering. Some features look formidable, such as spikes and rough metal, but others, such as stone fill and undulating surfaces, are passed off as decorative elements. Some people say all design aims to influence behavior, whether it’s architecture or a mobile app.  

folding cane stool

 

The design choices we make when trying to predict and guide the flow of people in exhibits and other museum spaces are also a form of design to influence behavior, although we may not think of them that way. You don’t put seating in an area where you want people to move along quickly. You make the font bigger when you want to make sure the audience reads something. I think that museum students and professionals could learn a lot by studying how urban planners think about design, to get an better understanding of the choices we make and how to make them.

 

 

First, there are the most direct applications. I work in downtown Boston, an area which has a homelessness problem. Until the city addresses the problem or provides adequate shelter, it’s pretty much a given that people will sleep in the covered stairwells leading into our building and many others in the neighborhood. If I had the luxury of designing a museum building, I would add an overhang with seating and a water fountain on one side, so that people who need protection from the elements overnight don’t sleep in front of doorways. It could even be heated in winter; solar-powered heated bus shelters have been around for years now. It would be a win-win, since we wouldn’t have to clear out the doorways each morning and people in need would be just a little safer and more comfortable. I don’t know if there is a solution that can be appropriately retrofit to our eighteenth-century building, but I’m going to keep thinking.

 

 

Learning from urban planning’s design for behavior can also be done in more creative ways. Museum researchers who do visitor studies look at which visitor spend time where, and with what features. Shouldn’t we all be doing that? This would incorporate a lot of existing knowledge, for example, if you want people to stay, make them comfortable, give them restrooms and seats. It would simply be a new way of looking at what we know and what we want to learn. It’s often valuable to start an exhibit planning process by asking ourselves “What do we want visitors to get out of this?” but shouldn’t we also ask, “How do we want them to behave?” As long as the outcome of this discussion is about supporting and encouraging visitors in good behavior, rather than rearranging the galleries into a panopticon with the guards at the center, I think it’s worth trying.

 

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on July 13, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

Research/Evaluation Associate [Museum of Science, Boston]

Education Coordinator [McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center] 

Director of Marketing [Newport Art Museum]

Oral History Intern [Nantucket Historical Association] 

Museum Registrar (temporary) [Bellarmine Museum of Art] 

Collections and Archives Manager [Saco Museum] 

Deputy Director, Collections, Research & Exhibitions [Corning Museum of Glass] 

Executive Director [Boothbay Railway Village] 

Executive Director [Montshire Museum of Science] 

Entry Level Research Historian [History Associates Incorporated]

Director of Exhibits [The Heath Museum] 

Executive Director [Palo Alto History Museum] 

Senior Museum Collections Manager [History Associates Incorporated] 

Project Coordinator/Collections Manager Soldier’s Memorial Project [Missouri History Museum] 

Curatorial Assistant [Thomas Jefferson Foundation - Monticello]

History Museum Manager [City of Tempe]

Head of Interpretation and Participatory Experiences [Minneapolis Institute of Arts] 

Curator and Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs [Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University] 

Associate Curator [Akron Art Museum] 

Assistant Art Curator [The Museums of Los Gatos] 

Manager of Visitor Services [Lower East Side Tenement Museum]

Preparator/Curatorial Assistant [Monterey Museum of Art]

Curator of Contemporary Art [Phoenix Art Museum] 

Curator of Collections & Exhibitions [Lauren Rogers Museum of Art]

Executive Director [Dubuque Museum of Art]

Research Assistant / Greek and Roman Art [The Met] 

Collections Manager [Franklin and Marshall College] 

Collections Manager/Registrar [Denison Museum]

Public Programs Manager [Bay Area Discovery Museum] 

Education Manager [Putnam Museum and Science Center] 

Chief Curator [Anchorage Museum] 

Executive Director [The Society of Arts and Crafts] 

Gallery Learning Museum Educator [Museum of Fine Arts, Boston]

Curator of Academic Projects [Rose Art Museum] 

Collections Manager [Mingei International Museum] 

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on July 6, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

Curatorial Assistant [The Buffalo Bill Center of the West]

William and Sarah Ross Soter (Associate) Curator of Photography [Columbus Museum of Art]

Collections Manager [The Metropolitan Museum of Art]

Director of Education and Public Programs [The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza]

Chief Preparator [Yerba Buena Center for the Art]

Visitor Services Manager [National 9/11 Memorial and Museum]

The Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow [RISD Museum]

Education Manager [Putnam Museum and Science Center]

Deputy Director Collections, Research and Exhibitions [Corning Museum of Glass]

Marketing & Events Director [Old South Meeting House]

Manager of Exhibitions and Gallery Education [New Art Center in Newton]

Manager of Science Education [Brooklyn Children's Museum]

Director of Education [Elkhorn Valley Museum]

Development Coordinator [deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum]

UMFA Coordinator of Educator Programs [Utah Museum of Fine Arts]

UMFA Coordinator of Educator Programs [Utah Museum of Fine Arts]

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on July 1, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

- Manager, Maritime Artisans Program [Plimoth Plantation]

- Educator Specialist [Mystic Seaport Museum]

- Curator [Natick Historical Society]

- Director of Education and Public Programs [Concord Museum]

- Manager of Family & Youth Programs [deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum]

- Associate Preparator [deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum]

- Education Director [American Indian Studies Museum and Research Center]

- Manager of Content and Curriculum, Secondary Level Programs [American Museum of Natural History]

- Adult Programs Coordinator [Peabody Essex Museum]

- Executive Assistant to the President/CEO [Boston Children's Museum]

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on June 22, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

- Maine Memory Network Content Assistant [Maine Historical Society]

- Manager of Youth and School Programs [Heritage Museum and Gardens]

- Deputy Director for Education & Audience Engagement [Montclair Art Museum]

- Director of Education and Interpretation [The Hermitage]

- Collections Specialist [Newseum]

- Collections Manager [National Law Enforcement Museum]

- Collections Technician [National Museum of Health and Medicine]

- Assistant/Associate Curator (Art of the Ancient Americas) [Los Angeles County Museum of Art]

-Assistant Registrar [Veritude at Fidelity Investments]

-Adult Programs Manager [Columbia Museum of Art]

- Assistant Registrar [Farnsworth Art Museum]

- Curator of American Art [Newark Museum]

- Collections Manager and Registrar [American Museum of Ceramic Art]

- Curator of Collections [Rockwell Museum]

- Volunteer Coordinator [Woodmere Art Museum]

- Education Program Coordinator [Iowa Children's Museum]

- Exhibitions Coordinator [Asia Society Texas Center]

- Director of Education and Public Programs [Georgia O'Keefe Museum]

- Executive Director [American Clock and Watch Museum]

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The Wider World: Getting to Know a New Area

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on June 21, 2014 in The Wider World |

Summer is often a time of change. Many recent graduates of the Tufts Museum Studies program are either already in, or in the process of finding, jobs that will take them to places they have never lived. Many of us are interning somewhere new to us. It’s great!

If museums are community institutions, and I believe they are (or should be), then when museum professionals are new to the community their museum serves, getting to know the neighborhood isn’t just a fun part of a new adventure in life. It’s an essential part of being  engaged and responsible in your new role. Here are some resources for getting to know a new area.

If your new area has a substantial population of a different ethnic background from you, or a significant low-income population, the series of “How Not to Be a Gentrifier” articles that were going around the internet a few months ago can be quite useful, especially if your own background includes racial or economic privilege. The most well-known and perhaps “original” version of this article refers specifically to Oakland, California. For a more generally applicable version, I recommend the one on Alternet. Both were written by Dannette Lambert.

Image by RedJar on Flickr, some rights reserved.

Image by RedJar on Flickr, some rights reserved.

Believe it or not, Mashable has some pretty good tips for putting your finger on the pulse of a new area, especially if it’s a city – Some of these are common sense, but when you’re dealing the the day-to-day details of living in a new place, like, “when’s trash day again?” it can be nice to have a list like this to help you remember the resources available to you for the more fun stuff.

While digging up resources for this post, I also noticed a number of common recommendations:
- Explore on foot or by bicycle to really get to know the place.

- Explore by public transit, even if you have a car.
- Take a guided walking tour offered by a community organization, another museum, or even a local hostel or hotel.
- Join local mailing lists or online communities.
I also loved one gem I only saw in one article. The rest of the article wasn’t very good, so I’m paraphrasing the best of it: read fiction set in your new area and written by locals. If possible, read local poetry, look at local art, listen to local music, and watch local films as well.
Have you moved to a new area recently, or do you have memories of getting to know a new place that you want to share? What are your recommendations? Feel free to chime in in the comments!

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on June 15, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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The Changing of the Guard

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on June 15, 2014 in blog news |
Congratulations to our outgoing blog manager, Phillippa Pitts, who graduated from Tufts with a Master’s in Art History and Museum Studies this spring.

Regular readers of the blog will know me, Tegan, as the author of the monthly column “The Wider World.” I’m going to be managing the blog this year. As in the past, you can send questions, inquiries about doing a column or guest post, and other communication that you don’t want to just leave in the comments to me at tuftsmuseumblog@gmail.com. Of course, if you have a response to a post here, you are always welcome to leave a comment.

As many of the students who have contributed to the blog this past year have now graduated, now’s an excellent time to get involved with the blog if you are interested! Shoot me an email if you want to write a guest post or a column. You can write columns weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, or on a schedule you propose. You can share column-writing duties with another student interested in the same topic, or do your own thing. Drop me a line!

Tegan

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Tegan Kehoe on June 8, 2014 in jobs listings, Uncategorized |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Free Workshop for EMPS next Thursday

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on May 29, 2014 in boston emps, conferences, free resources, professional development |
It’s exactly as it sounds: a FREE workshop with one of our favorite Tufts professors with no registration fee.
Creativity in Museum Practice
Thursday, June 5, 6:00 – 8:00 pm
USS Constitution Museum
Join Rainey Tisdale and Linda Norris, authors of the new book Creativity in Museum Practice, for a fun, useful, and informative workshop about creativity, both for yourself and for your museum.
Let us know the YEPs know that you’re coming by signing up on Eventbrite.

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A walking tour of New England at home…

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on May 24, 2014 in events |

If you’re looking for something outdoors yet educational to do on Sunday, June 1, consider joining the Lexington Historical Society’s event! Here’s the extra info they sent in…

The Lexington Historical Society is hosting its sixth annual house tour Homes in the Heart of Lexington which includes a dozen homes within walking distance of Lexington Center on Sunday, June 1, 11:00 – 5:00 pm. The tour showcases over 200 years of change in residential styles from the first brick house built in Lexington, to mid-19th Century summer estates, to a contemporary condominium. Advance tickets are $20 members/$25 non-members. Visit lexingtonhistory.org for more information.

 

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on May 23, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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Museum Next Scholarships!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on May 22, 2014 in conferences, free resources, professional development |

If you haven’t heard of Museum Next… you should! It’s Europe’s major conference on museums and technology AND they’re offering incredibly simple-to-apply-to scholarships for student EMPs.

Find out more here.

 

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Time-sensitive Job Listing

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on May 15, 2014 in jobs listings |

The deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum is looking for an Executive Assistant (EA) to the Director, to start immediately. This part time position provides administrative and project-based support to deCordova’s Interim Director and Board with occasional work in donor relations, event support, and assistance to the Development program as required. It is temporary with a possibility of becoming permanent.

To learn more, read the PDF job description here.

 

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Tonight — Snapshots Opening Reception!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on May 6, 2014 in Uncategorized |

Don’t forget that tonight is the opening reception for the Museum Studies curated exhibition Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition. 

You’ve been reading their blog entries about their progress, now see for yourself what they’ve put together. Join them tonight from 5:30-8 at the Tufts University Art Gallery, 40 Talbot Ave, Medford MA 02155.

Congratulations, students!

 

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The Importance of Collections Access on the Web

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on April 23, 2014 in Uncategorized |

by guest columnist Elyse Werling

Students in this year’s Exhibition Planning class were given a challenge: choose an image that inspires you from the photographs in Historic New England’s exhibition, “The Camera’s Coast,” and use it as a jumping-off point for a full-blown exhibition plan. Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition is to take place at the Tufts University Koppleman Gallery May 6-18, 2014. Opening reception Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 5:30-8pm. See the Facebook page here.

As a museum professional, you must be conscious of protecting your collection yet at the same time must facilitate access to the collection. For many, the question of whether to provide online collections access poses both risks and benefits. I have often heard that museums that post online access spur greater interest in their collections which in turn generates more visitors. I myself have often debated the risks and benefits to posting collections on line and until this point have been on the fence about it.

Read more…

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Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition: “Bull” Halsey

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on April 22, 2014 in Uncategorized |

by guest columnist Brian Miskell

Students in this year’s Exhibition Planning class were given a challenge: choose an image that inspires you from the photographs in Historic New England’s exhibition, “The Camera’s Coast,” and use it as a jumping-off point for a full-blown exhibition plan. Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition is to take place at the Tufts University Koppleman Gallery May 6-18, 2014. Opening reception Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 5:30-8pm. See the Facebook page here.

My exhibition plan focuses on the career of Fleet Admiral William F. “Bull” Halsey, US Navy (Retired). My photograph is of the first ship he served on fresh out of the Naval Academy, USS Missouri (BB-11).

I was recently reading Halsey’s autobiography, Admiral Halsey’s Story, which he wrote after World War II. From October 18, 1942 until July 15, 1944, Halsey served as Commander, South Pacific Area. While reading this section of his book, I saw a passage describing how Eleanor Roosevelt was to visit his area. Reading this, I recalled seeing a photograph that included someone I believed at the time could have been Eleanor Roosevelt among a large group photos that my grandfather had kept from his time serving in the 13th Army Air Force in the Pacific during World War II. After reading about the visit, I retrieved the collection of photos, went through them, and found two photos that included both Halsey and Mrs. Roosevelt. The activity taking place in one of the photos is actually described in Halsey’s book, “At one hospital, I arranged for her to pin the Navy Cross and two Purple Hearts on my ‘one-man army,’ Lieutenant Miller of the Strong.”

While I am not sure where my grandfather obtained the prints, I’m assuming they were stock photos he acquired as he wasn’t in the area at the time.

While I am not sure where my grandfather obtained the prints, I’m assuming they were stock photos he acquired as he wasn’t in the area at the time.

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My Journey on the Piscataqua

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on April 19, 2014 in Uncategorized |

by guest columnist Amanda Breen

Students in this year’s Exhibition Planning class were given a challenge: choose an image that inspires you from the photographs in Historic New England’s exhibition, “The Camera’s Coast,” and use it as a jumping-off point for a full-blown exhibition plan. Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition is to take place at the Tufts University Koppleman Gallery May 6-18, 2014. Opening reception Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 5:30-8pm. See the Facebook page here.

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My experience sailing on the Piscataqua, a traditional reproduction of the flat-bottom gundalow barges that were once prevalent along the local waterways of the Piscataqua River Region, sparked my interest in the photograph Fanny M., which was the last gundalow to operate commercially in the area. The gundalow, not especially handsome, was a practical working vessel perfectly adapted to the environment. One or two farmers could construct the utilitarian design of the gundalow over the course of the winter season. Uncaulked and unpainted, the vessels were given little care, yet the communities were entirely dependent on these vessels to transport necessary goods throughout the Piscataqua River region up until the twentieth century.

Read more…

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Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on April 8, 2014 in Uncategorized |

by guest columnist Barbara Palmer

Students in this year’s Exhibition Planning class were given a challenge: choose an image that inspires you from the photographs in Historic New England’s exhibition, “The Camera’s Coast,” and use it as a jumping-off point for a full-blown exhibition plan. Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition is to take place at the Tufts University Koppleman Gallery May 6-18, 2014. Opening reception Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 5:30-8pm. See the Facebook page here.

By now, you’ve probably heard that this year’s Exhibition Planning course is trying something new. Instead of curating an exhibition as a group with a set collection as in previous years, each class member is developing a proposal for an individual exhibition, with one object from a shared collection as a touchstone.

As my exhibition idea, titled, “Open Water: Women’s Swimwear and the Fight to Compete,” has grown throughout the semester, I’ve realized that developing ideas on your own can lead to feeling stuck in your own silo (or, “column of excellence,” an alternative moniker I’ve heard lately lately). Developing an entire exhibit solo not only lends a powerful feeling of freedom in making decisions without compromise or consequence, but can alternatively leave one feeling a bit alone in the planning too. In our future museum careers, the process of exhibit design collaboration in which we may be participating won’t come without a team in some way, shape, or form, so I’ve appreciated the opportunities both given and sought out to collaborate with others.

Read more…

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Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on April 7, 2014 in Uncategorized |

by guest columnist Sarah McDonough

Students in this year’s Exhibition Planning class were given a challenge: choose an image that inspires you from the photographs in Historic New England’s exhibition, “The Camera’s Coast,” and use it as a jumping-off point for a full-blown exhibition plan. Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition is to take place at the Tufts University Koppleman Gallery May 6-18, 2014. Opening reception Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 5:30-8pm. See the Facebook page here.

The research process for this class has really shown just how much untapped history there is out there that most people aren’t aware of. While reading for my exhibit, A Little House on Deck: The Curious Journeys of Whaling Wives and Children at Sea, I discovered dozens of surviving diaries of women and girls who sailed as passengers on whaling ships. Reading through accounts of their adventures, it’s frustrating that so many of these people would not be remembered except for their writing, or the snippets of stories remembered about them. Here’s a particularly interesting one:

In 1846 the whaling ship Powhattan set out of Martha’s Vineyard for a hunt off the coast of New Zealand, on what appeared to be a cursed voyage. Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on April 6, 2014 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on April 1, 2014 in Uncategorized |

by guest columnist Catherine Shortliffe

Students in this year’s Exhibition Planning class were given a challenge: choose an image that inspires you from the photographs in Historic New England’s exhibition, “The Camera’s Coast,” and use it as a jumping-off point for a full-blown exhibition plan. Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition is to take place at the Tufts University Koppleman Gallery May 6-18, 2014. Opening reception Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 5:30-8pm. See the Facebook page here.

This past week, as part of my research for my exhibition, Shipwreck: The Shoreline experience, and in an effort to connect with the subjects of my exhibition, I headed south to the shore to visit the Hull Lifesaving Museum in Hull, Massachusetts. I set out with hopes of learning more about the lifesaving teams that make up about a third of my complete exhibition plan, and discovering artifacts that would help round out my otherwise two dimensional exhibition. I am happy to report that both of these goals were achieved and the trip was a great success!

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Wider World

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on April 1, 2014 in The Wider World |

by columnist Tegan Kehoe

A couple weeks ago, I was a part of Boston’s first History Camp, an “unconference” that was organized by volunteers and a wiki. One of the panels was on means of publishing for history books, and Boston historian J. L. Bell made point I think applies just as well to museums. He said that people — particularly writers — are used to thinking of publishing houses as the gatekeepers: people who control what gets inside, people who has to please, appease, or even depend on the whims of. With e-books, inexpensive self-publishing and other text formats flooding the market, he proposed, it makes just as much sense to think of gatekeepers (whether they are publishers, reviewers, or others) as ushering readers in through open gates, helping them find what’s good and what suits their tastes. I think the same metaphor can be used to talk about museums as gatekeepers of knowledge, stories, and images or artifacts.

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It’s All About Image

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on March 25, 2014 in Uncategorized |

by guest blogger Emma Mällinen

Students in this year’s Exhibition Planning class were given a challenge: choose an image that inspires you from the photographs in Historic New England’s exhibition, “The Camera’s Coast,” and use it as a jumping-off point for a full-blown exhibition plan. Snapshots: 15 Takes on an Exhibition is to take place at the Tufts University Koppleman Gallery May 6-18, 2014. Opening reception Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 5:30-8pm. See the Facebook page here.

I am in the midst of planning an exhibition titled, “How We Describe the Wild: American Encounters with Nature,” an exhibition that celebrates the past and present of American writers who shaped the way we view our natural environment. From revisiting classics by Thoreau and Emerson to dissecting the controversial works of Edward Abbey and Rachel Carson, the exhibition highlights the milestones of American ecocriticism and nature appreciation.

Now, that sounds pretty text-based and potentially dry. How can you engage people in long texts in an energetic exhibition? This is the primary obstacle I’ve come up against, but one I’ve found some great solutions for.

Read more…

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