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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on November 17, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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The 95th Annual NEMA Conference

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on November 15, 2013 in professional development |

by editor Phillippa Pitts

Just home from Newport, RI and the 95th New England Museum Association Conference. NEMA is a fantastic organization that really brings together a diverse group of museums for three days of sessions, workshops, frantic business card swapping, and networking. People walk into the conference looking for someone who knows about volunteer recruitment or outreach to visitors with low vision. And we all leave exhausted but feeling incredibly professionally developed.

What’s great about coming to NEMA as a Tufts Museum Studies student is the network of Tufts faculty, alumni, and fellow students. They’re not just represented on panels and with peer institutions. They’re part of the conference leadership. They work for NEMA, chair its PAGs (professional affinity groups), and received fellowships and scholarships. (Thanks so much to the NEMA Board and Staff for my own Fellowship — which I’ll share more about in later posts).

As I’ve yet to master the art of being in multiple places at once, I only could participate in a fraction of the sessions, events, and conversations that occurred over the course of the week. So, look out for a number of posts from current and past Tufts students who want to share what they learned in Newport.

If you were at NEMA and I haven’t approached you yet, email tuftsmuseumblog@gmail.com. We’d love to hear what you learned, observed, or figured out over the course of the conference.

 

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on November 11, 2013 in Uncategorized |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on November 2, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Science in Museums: Carl Akeley, Museum Innovator

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 23, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Kacie Rice

Carl Akeley, museum hero and innovator, posing with a leopard he took down bare-handed. Photo from the American Museum of Natural History.

Carl Akeley, museum hero and innovator, posing with a leopard he took down bare-handed. Photo from the American Museum of Natural History.

“Why museums?” It’s a question that haunts the museum world – whether it’s, “Why do you work in a museum?”, “Why should we bring our students on a museum field trip?”, “Why do we need museums?”, or the big one, “Why should my organization give money to your museum?”, we answer this question all the time. We answer that we’re advocates of free choice learning, that we preserve and protect our collective heritage, that we create valuable community gathering spaces, and for some of us, that we really do just like hanging out in smelly rooms full of animal skins. For the last century and a half, museums have been any and all of these things to our society and to the people who work in them, but they’ve also provided a service that many people don’t expect: innovation.

Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 18, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

But first, we have a few fellowships to announce:

And, back to jobs:

 

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Exploring Science Museums Through Google Street View

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 16, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Catherine Sigmond

Finally, Google has brought its widely acclaimed Art Project to science museums… sort of.

Lately, I’ve been indulging my penchant for travel by exploring the world through Google Street View (did you know you can tour the Galapagos?!).

So when I read about how Google Street View had recently released a virtual tour of the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto I was pretty intrigued.

Read more…

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Museums in the Nudes

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 14, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

There is a trend here in Philadelphia that I think you should know about.

It’s called “Boy-lesque” and it combines burlesque dancing – an artistically-minded nude show – with boys. You could call it male stripping…but that’s not exactly accurate. It’s more about pushing the audience past their comfort zone than the sex. It forces you to talk about objectification, and to think about gender, and consider what it is, exactly, that makes you so squeamish about naked people. (After all, we’re all naked under our clothes, right?)

The thing is, classic burlesque dancing has become passé in the age of HBO and Fifty Shades of Grey. It has lately been repurposed to empower women and promote positive body image. It could be used to talk about serious issues, but it’s hard to shock someone into discussion when the shock of seeing mostly naked women in public has all but worn off.

Read more…

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Exhibit Spaces and Exhibit Catalogs

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 9, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by Cira Louise Brown

Over the past few months, I have been working to develop an exhibition catalog from an exhibit currently on display. The exhibition explores the topic of time from various cultural, scientific and mechanical standpoints, and uses artifacts from a variety of institutions and collections. I find the show to be very successful in its ambitions, and the content has even been integrated into a college class. Given that it’s a temporary exhibition, lasting less than a year, there was a need to preserve the content in the form of a catalog, in both eBook and iBook formats. I was tasks with laying out the book, using the existing style of exhibition.

As with so many design projects such as these, the task seemed straightforward enough. The exhibit content was done, photography of the objects was mostly completed, and the design standards had already been decided upon. Yet translating an exhibit into a book remains a tricky task.

So, in my brief foray into exhibition catalogs, here’s a little list of what I’ve learned. Read more…

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Reminder! Tomorrow’s talk at the Peabody Museum!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 8, 2013 in events |

Join Kevin Gover, the Director of the National Museum of the American Indian, tomorrow at 6 p.m. for a free talk and reception.

Here’s the invitation for more details!

You are invited to attend a 6:00 PM public talk and reception on Wednesday, October 9 at the Peabody Museum, “”Changing the Narrative: American Indians and American Cultural Myth,” with Kevin Gover, Director, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution.

Kevin Gover is a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma and has been the director of the National Museum of the American Indian since 2007. He is a former professor of law at Arizona State University and was the co-executive director of the ASU American Indian Policy Institute. He also served as Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs for the U.S. Department of the Interior from 1997–2000.

Come for the talk at Harvard’s Geological Lecture Hall (26 Oxford Street, Cambridge), and stay for the special reception in the Wiyohpiyata: Lakota Images of the Contested West exhibition in the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.

Co-sponsored by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology at Harvard University and the Harvard University Native American Program

 

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Learning Large Print

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 7, 2013 in The Wider World |

by Tegan Kehoe

This fall, the museum where I work is having an exterior restoration project done, and this means the building will be enveloped by scaffolding with dark mesh covers. The gallery, which is largely lit by natural light, will be considerably dimmer. After a staff meeting that included a lot of joking around about lending out headlamps in admissions, a few of us realized that now would be a great time to create large print exhibit guides, which had been in the back of our minds for a while. I volunteered to spearhead the effort.

I set about looking for resources and examples to make the guides as useful as possible. In doing so, I learned that there are few universally-accepted standards in this area. In addition to making the font large, it is important to print on opaque, non-glossy paper, to minimize special formatting, and to use a clear and readable font, but often, I found I just had to read what many different groups had to say and choose what seemed to make the most sense for this particular project. I wish we had a focus group of testers, but it doesn’t look like that will happen. Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 6, 2013 in museums in the news |

Of course, undeniably the story for this week is the fallout from the government shutdown: shuttering museums, historic sites and parks around the country. Although many articles, like this one from the Washington Post, focus on the National Mall, let’s not forget the bigger impact around the country.

Image Credit Kevin Lamarque /Reuters/Landov

Image Credit Kevin Lamarque /Reuters/Landov

Of course, as with any such situation, there are the heroes. For example, the Indianapolis Children’s Museum offered free admission for federal employees. While it was only for a weekend and family members still had to pay, what a great gesture to liven the spirits of furloughed workers!

In other news,  Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 4, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Exhibition Opening next Monday!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 3, 2013 in events |

Join Historic New England and the Boston Society of Architects for the opening of Boston City Hall: Drawings by Kallman McKinnell and Knowles. The reception will be held next Monday, October 7, at 5:30 p.m. at the BSA Space, 290 Congress Street, Suite 200 in Boston.

To attend, RSVP to rsvp@architects.org with BCH 10/7 in the subject line.

 

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Museum Review: The Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on October 2, 2013 in Science in Museums, Uncategorized |

by columnist Kacie Rice

The Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto.

The Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto.

One of my favorite things to do is when I travel is to see new museums, and I and a friend recently had a chance to visit Toronto’s Royal Ontario Museum (ROM), one of North America’s major natural history and anthropology museums. Founded in 1912, the museum serves over one million visitors a year and acts as Canada’s largest field research institution. ROM has a much more encyclopedic collection than we might expect of a typical natural history museum in the United States, more closely following the European model of the “cabinet of curiosity” than the American system of division between subject areas. In addition to dinosaurs, minerals, stuffed animals, and anthropology collections, the museum also houses arts from around the world and artifacts from Canadian history. The ROM’s collections are almost impossible to visit in a single day: in four hours, we weren’t even able to see half of the permanent exhibits – but what we did see was terrific! Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 29, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 29, 2013 in museums in the news |

This week’s featured story: before the lawsuit buzz over deceptive “suggested admission” donations has even died down, the Met is in newspaper hot water again for a recent Groupon deal: $18 for admission for one to the Met…

from The Gothamist

from The Gothamist

Here’s the Gothamist article, but there are scores of others out there. What do you think? Deceptive? Overreacting media? Either way, it’s a big PR flop in my book!

In other news…  Read more…

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5 Places to Check Out Science in Museums this Fall

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 25, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Catherine Sigmond

If you’re like me, sometimes the demands of work, school, and life get in the way of actually visiting new museums.  This week, I had the sinking realization that despite my best efforts, I couldn’t remember the last time I visited a new science museum or exhibition. What’s a busy museum professional to do?

I sat down and put together a list of local science museums, exhibitions, and events that I want to visit in the near future. Most of us here in Boston have been to the Museum of Science, but there are plenty of other great places in the area where you can check out interesting science-themed exhibitions and programs.

While it’s by no means exhaustive, these top my short-list of must-see local science events, exhibitions, and museums to visit this fall: Read more…

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Conference Announcement: Changing the Narrative: American Indians and American Cultural Myth

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 24, 2013 in conferences, learning opportunities, meetups |

In just a couple weeks, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology will be hosting Kevin Gover, the Director of the National Museum of the American Indian. You’re invited to a free talk and reception on Wednesday, October 9, beginning at 6p.m.

Kevin Gover, courtesy of the New York Times

Here’s the invitation for more details:  Read more…

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A little levity for your Monday morning…

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 23, 2013 in potpourri |

Courtesy of Buzzfeed: The Smartest, Funniest, Most Informative Museum Ads. Definitely good for the inspiration box… and good for a giggle.

courtesy of adsoftheworld.com

Happy Monday?

 

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 22, 2013 in Uncategorized |

In this week’s featured article, the Association of Art Museum Curators has moved it’s May conference to Detroit in a show of support for the DIA. Since they city’s bankruptcy, the DIA’s iconic collection has been under threat.

If you haven’t seen the DIA, you don’t know what they’re threatening. Floor-to-ceiling murals, of Detroit Industry, by Diego Rivera. A room full of mummies. A truly encyclopedic collection that takes you around the world. Kudos to the AAMC for not only a fantastic gesture, but for giving major curators (and thus major voices in the field) a reason to come to Detroit and become impassioned about saving the DIA.

courtesy of Brandy Baker/The Detroit News

In other news…

Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 20, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Science in Museums: Exhibition Review – Hidden Heroes: The Genius of Everyday Things

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 18, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by Cira Brown

“Look closer”, “dig deeper”… if you’re doing that, you’re the type of museum visitor that we love. But how do we foster that level of engagement? “Hidden Heroes: The Genius of Every Day Things”, currently on view at the MIT Museum, aspires to do exactly that. The exhibition showcases seemingly-mundane everyday objects, such as paperclips, matches, and rubberbands, and heralds them as heroes. But this isn’t a show that simply seeks to celebrate various inventors’ ingenuity. Design narratives share the stage with manufacturing processes, historic advertisements and artistic recontextualizations (ranging from ornate sculptures to reconfiguring the object itself).This is an exhibition with themes of consumerism throughout, yet it doesn’t explicitly confront these issues — instead, we examine the objects and their histories free of the associated tensions between sustainability and disposability (almost, at least). These no-frills devices represent the extreme of function over form, yet when you see an array of illuminated clothespins in starbursts, it’s easy to forget their utility for a moment. I enjoy that type of reimagining, and the unstructured and non-linear presentation of these items is a refreshing change of rhythm from standard museum displays. That adage, “design has to work, art doesn’t”, whether true or not, was present in mind throughout the visit.

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 13, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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Science in Museums: Museums in Nature

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 11, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Kacie Rice

Stone bridge at the Middlesex Fells Reservation.

Stone bridge at the Middlesex Fells Reservation.

This weekend, after a busy and stressful few weeks of moving apartments and starting classes, I decided to go old-school and explore the original science museum: the nature reservation! I put on my boots and went to unwind in nature with a hike in our very own forest, the Middlesex Fells Reservation in Medford. I often find that short day hikes allow me to take on the role of John Falk’s “spiritual pilgrim,” though on this occasion, I found myself more of an “explorer” as I found new trails to discover. The Friends of the Fells, a nonprofit preservation group, maintains a website with various trail maps, where I found a map and PDF guide for the Spot Pond Brook Archaeological District Self-Guided Tour, a 0.8 mile loop that passes through former mill settlements in the Virginia Wood forest. Interested hikers can download the guide, which gives background information on eleven different sites marked with numbered posts along the trail.

Read more…

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Not A Spectacle, But Not a Motivator, Either

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 9, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

About this time last year, I attended a NEMA conference session entitled “Spectacle or Motivator? Violent Content in Exhibitions.” Amy Weisser, Director of Exhibit Development at the National September 11th Memorial and Museum, spent a good deal of time talking about how she managed to look at violent or upsetting content day  in and day out.  I specifically remember her saying she hoped to honor the collections pieces and narrate a compelling story, rather than make a specific political or opinion statement about 9/11.

This week, to mark the  anniversary of 9/11, NBC News’ PhotoBlog gave us a sneak peek of what the museum will look like, and of some of the artifacts on display.

Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 8, 2013 in museums in the news |

This week’s featured article, a fascinating math museum that makes learning look so much fun I want to try it.

Screen Shot 2013-09-08 at 12.25.29 PM

In other news: Read more…

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Science in Museums: Fukushima’s Fallout for Science Museums

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 4, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by Catherine Sigmond

If you haven’t been paying attention to what’s been happening in Fukushima, Japan, recently, let me summarize the current situation: after the devastating earthquake and tsunami in 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant suffered a triple meltdown- the only incident other than the Chernobyl disaster to earn the highest rating of 7 on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale. Since then, the constant pumping of cold water to cool the reactors has contained the meltdown. However, this process generates hundreds of tons of radioactive wastewater each day. There’s increasingly less space to store this contaminated water, and last month it was discovered that around 300 tons of it had leaked into the ground. The crisis, which in recent months had been bumped down from its initial rating of 7 to 1, was just increased to 3. In other words, there’s a lot of uncertainty about what to do, and the situation is nowhere near being resolved.

Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 1, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

First, this week’s featured story: Van Gogh Museum 3D Prints Its Own PaintingsAlthough for now the price-tag makes them an expensive gift shop item, I wonder what the future uses could be? Hands-on experiences for kids and school visits? Greater access for those with low vision?

A 3D Print of Van Gogh’s Wheatfield Under Thunderclouds. Courtesy of Hyperallergic.

 

In other news:  Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-up

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 30, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Special Edition – Why I Don’t Hate James Durston

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 29, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

You may have read this week that CNN Travel’s senior producer James Durston hates museums.

If, like me, you work in a museum, Durston’s opinion piece may have really grilled your cheese. I’ll be the first to admit, I had steam coming out of my ears. But before you sharpen your pitchforks and light up the torches to chase him out of town, I encourage you to stop, take a breath, and consider this:

Durston’s article is the Miley Cyrus VMA performance of museum criticism – it is so over the top and so clearly baiting us to react that it deserves to be met with the most minimal reaction possible.

So rather than a ranting response, I suggest we take a calm and critical look at Durston’s complaints. Let’s start a conversation about how we can fix the legitimate problems he brings up, and clear up the misconceptions he’s trying to perpetuate. Read more…

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Games, games, games…

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 27, 2013 in education, food for thought, technology |

by editor Phillippa Pitts

Games have been on my mind a lot this week. I know a lot of people who spend their incredible brainpower building games for museums, like Kellian Adams Pletcher with Murder at the Met, or Susan Edward with the Getty’s Switch (which I admire for its incredible simplicity!). I’ve even built a few games myself with SCVNGR. Nevertheless, I tend to approach gamification from a skeptical starting point.

This week, two new games crossed my desk that couldn’t be more different from each other: History Hero and Papers, Please.

History Heros, Courtesy of HistoryHeros.com

History Heros, Courtesy of HistoryHeros.com

“Papers Please,” courtesy of Slate

Read more…

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Change is Gonna Come

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 26, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

My family and I saw Lee Daniel’s The Butler last weekend. It sparked a family conversation about change over time. The main question: Can individuals – and then, by association, institutions – change? And what does it really take to implement that change?

We all had differing opinions.

People can change, my sister posited. Given enough evidence, smart people almost always will change their opinions to support the “right” side of things.

People change superficially, my parents submitted. One can intellectually change a position, but emotions are deep-seated, and the way one really feels about things – deep down on the inside – is usually pretty unwavering.

I think I was perhaps the most radical. Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 25, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

First, what do you think? Should Scotland Yard open its grisly murder museum to the public? Read the article and share your thoughts in the comments. Educational? Icky? Unethical?

The pot and cooker used by murderer Dennis Nilsen to boil his victims’ flesh features in the museum. Courtesy of The Daily Express.

In other news:  Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-up

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 23, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

Also, this week, an internship opportunity with Tufts professor David Guss, preparing for his exhibition, Scenic Views: A Picture Postcard History of Somerville.

 

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Science in Museums: Art and Science Collide at the National Building Museum

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 21, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Kacie Rice

My summer internship in Washington, D.C., has given me a great opportunity to explore a lot of new (to me) museums. This weekend, I checked out the National Building Museum, established by Act of Congress in 1980 and located in the historic 1887 Pension Bureau building in downtown Washington. The building itself is definitely befitting of a museum of architecture and city planning: the outside is an impressive red brick façade with a wraparound frieze depicting various military units, while the inside is a cavernous space supported by eight huge Corinthian columns. Multiple Presidents have held their inauguration balls inside the building, and it is regularly used for political events. Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 18, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

But first, if you’re still in the Boston area, don’t forget to check out our newest and tiniest Museum located right in Union Square.

 

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 18, 2013 in jobs listings |

Apologies for my tardiness with the listing. Nevertheless, here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Science in Museums: 8 Reasons You Need to Visit the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 14, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by Catherine Sigmond

When people go to Paris, they always want to visit the Louvre. But did you know that Paris also has the world’s most popular science museum? Here are 8 reasons you should visit the Cité des Science et de l’Industrie next time you’re in the City of Love.

Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 11, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

Also: Not sure if Museum is an actual museum or not, but worth reading about and browsing their Flickr page! Could this sort of speakeasy gallery be a possibility for other museums? (Also featured in the NYTimes)

 

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 9, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

0

Science in Museums: What makes a successful hands-on demonstration in the gallery?

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 7, 2013 in Science in Museums |
by columnist Cira Brown
I’ve been doing the “Perceptual Form of the City” hands-on demo at the MIT Museum for almost a year now, and it’s my first experience in engaging with visitors in the museum directly.  The premise for the demo is as follows: I ask the visitors to draw a map of Boston and then ask them to consider why they chose certain features and compare it to other maps that I have on hand. I then relate patterns in their drawings to the research of MIT Professor Kevin A. Lynch and his book Images of the City (1960), which is a landmark text in urban planning. In the 1950′s, Professor Lynch asked both visitors and residents of Boston to draw the city, and found insights into what details make a city “work” and what doesn’t. I’m not going to go into details in hopes that you’ll swing by the MIT Museum one weekend and participate!
Recently, I’ve been reflecting on what makes this demonstration successful, especially since I’m in the midst of creating my own. I’ve adapted the way I engage with visitors since starting out at the museum last autumn, and here’s a list of things that I’ve found helps ensure success:

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Exhibit Review – SPY: The Secret World of Espionage

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 5, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

I have never had the desire to design exhibits, write labels or work in conservation. When it comes to museums, I am Team Education, Outreach and Interpretation through and through.

But I still want exhibits to be well executed. It makes my job easier as an educator if I have good material to work with; it makes my time as a visitor more enjoyable if I can follow an exhibit’s narrative thread.

spy-franklin-institute- Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 4, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

But perhaps the most hot-button issue of the week was the Smithsonian’s request to acquire Trayvon Martin’s hoodie for their museum collections. (Here’s the NY Post article.) What do you think?

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 2, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

0

Food for Thought

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 29, 2013 in Uncategorized |

Have you checked out AAM’s excellence in label-writing award winners?

View all the winning entries here!

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 26, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

0

Learning from 100-year-old Museum Education

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 25, 2013 in education, food for thought |

Check out this amazing story from the Sunderland Museum. In 1913, their curator came up with a program for blind visitors–adults and children–to let them explore objects. Architectural columns, historical gas masks, and scores of natural history specimens were included.

courtesy of Atlas Obscura

courtesy of Atlas Obscura

Make sure you scroll to the end of the article to see the clay models that the visitors made after their visit. Really incredible!

How is this different from what we do today?

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: I’ve Got a Bone to Pick

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 22, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

I think I might be desensitized to extra disgusting things. I regularly see kids eating things they definitely shouldn’t eat. I’ve seen lots and lots of blood spurting from noses and foreheads and knees after tumbles down stairs. I get sneezed on, and coughed on, and just this week a toddler wiped her wet thumb – fresh from a good thirty minutes of sucking – right down my neck.

Maybe it’s part of working at a children’s museum. Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 21, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

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