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5 Places to Check Out Science in Museums this Fall

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 25, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Catherine Sigmond

If you’re like me, sometimes the demands of work, school, and life get in the way of actually visiting new museums.  This week, I had the sinking realization that despite my best efforts, I couldn’t remember the last time I visited a new science museum or exhibition. What’s a busy museum professional to do?

I sat down and put together a list of local science museums, exhibitions, and events that I want to visit in the near future. Most of us here in Boston have been to the Museum of Science, but there are plenty of other great places in the area where you can check out interesting science-themed exhibitions and programs.

While it’s by no means exhaustive, these top my short-list of must-see local science events, exhibitions, and museums to visit this fall: Read more…

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Conference Announcement: Changing the Narrative: American Indians and American Cultural Myth

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 24, 2013 in conferences, learning opportunities, meetups |

In just a couple weeks, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology will be hosting Kevin Gover, the Director of the National Museum of the American Indian. You’re invited to a free talk and reception on Wednesday, October 9, beginning at 6p.m.

Kevin Gover, courtesy of the New York Times

Here’s the invitation for more details:  Read more…

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A little levity for your Monday morning…

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 23, 2013 in potpourri |

Courtesy of Buzzfeed: The Smartest, Funniest, Most Informative Museum Ads. Definitely good for the inspiration box… and good for a giggle.

courtesy of adsoftheworld.com

Happy Monday?

 

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 22, 2013 in Uncategorized |

In this week’s featured article, the Association of Art Museum Curators has moved it’s May conference to Detroit in a show of support for the DIA. Since they city’s bankruptcy, the DIA’s iconic collection has been under threat.

If you haven’t seen the DIA, you don’t know what they’re threatening. Floor-to-ceiling murals, of Detroit Industry, by Diego Rivera. A room full of mummies. A truly encyclopedic collection that takes you around the world. Kudos to the AAMC for not only a fantastic gesture, but for giving major curators (and thus major voices in the field) a reason to come to Detroit and become impassioned about saving the DIA.

courtesy of Brandy Baker/The Detroit News

In other news…

Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 20, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Science in Museums: Exhibition Review – Hidden Heroes: The Genius of Everyday Things

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 18, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by Cira Brown

“Look closer”, “dig deeper”… if you’re doing that, you’re the type of museum visitor that we love. But how do we foster that level of engagement? “Hidden Heroes: The Genius of Every Day Things”, currently on view at the MIT Museum, aspires to do exactly that. The exhibition showcases seemingly-mundane everyday objects, such as paperclips, matches, and rubberbands, and heralds them as heroes. But this isn’t a show that simply seeks to celebrate various inventors’ ingenuity. Design narratives share the stage with manufacturing processes, historic advertisements and artistic recontextualizations (ranging from ornate sculptures to reconfiguring the object itself).This is an exhibition with themes of consumerism throughout, yet it doesn’t explicitly confront these issues — instead, we examine the objects and their histories free of the associated tensions between sustainability and disposability (almost, at least). These no-frills devices represent the extreme of function over form, yet when you see an array of illuminated clothespins in starbursts, it’s easy to forget their utility for a moment. I enjoy that type of reimagining, and the unstructured and non-linear presentation of these items is a refreshing change of rhythm from standard museum displays. That adage, “design has to work, art doesn’t”, whether true or not, was present in mind throughout the visit.

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 13, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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Science in Museums: Museums in Nature

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 11, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Kacie Rice

Stone bridge at the Middlesex Fells Reservation.

Stone bridge at the Middlesex Fells Reservation.

This weekend, after a busy and stressful few weeks of moving apartments and starting classes, I decided to go old-school and explore the original science museum: the nature reservation! I put on my boots and went to unwind in nature with a hike in our very own forest, the Middlesex Fells Reservation in Medford. I often find that short day hikes allow me to take on the role of John Falk’s “spiritual pilgrim,” though on this occasion, I found myself more of an “explorer” as I found new trails to discover. The Friends of the Fells, a nonprofit preservation group, maintains a website with various trail maps, where I found a map and PDF guide for the Spot Pond Brook Archaeological District Self-Guided Tour, a 0.8 mile loop that passes through former mill settlements in the Virginia Wood forest. Interested hikers can download the guide, which gives background information on eleven different sites marked with numbered posts along the trail.

Read more…

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Not A Spectacle, But Not a Motivator, Either

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 9, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

About this time last year, I attended a NEMA conference session entitled “Spectacle or Motivator? Violent Content in Exhibitions.” Amy Weisser, Director of Exhibit Development at the National September 11th Memorial and Museum, spent a good deal of time talking about how she managed to look at violent or upsetting content day  in and day out.  I specifically remember her saying she hoped to honor the collections pieces and narrate a compelling story, rather than make a specific political or opinion statement about 9/11.

This week, to mark the  anniversary of 9/11, NBC News’ PhotoBlog gave us a sneak peek of what the museum will look like, and of some of the artifacts on display.

Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 8, 2013 in museums in the news |

This week’s featured article, a fascinating math museum that makes learning look so much fun I want to try it.

Screen Shot 2013-09-08 at 12.25.29 PM

In other news: Read more…

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Science in Museums: Fukushima’s Fallout for Science Museums

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 4, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by Catherine Sigmond

If you haven’t been paying attention to what’s been happening in Fukushima, Japan, recently, let me summarize the current situation: after the devastating earthquake and tsunami in 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant suffered a triple meltdown- the only incident other than the Chernobyl disaster to earn the highest rating of 7 on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale. Since then, the constant pumping of cold water to cool the reactors has contained the meltdown. However, this process generates hundreds of tons of radioactive wastewater each day. There’s increasingly less space to store this contaminated water, and last month it was discovered that around 300 tons of it had leaked into the ground. The crisis, which in recent months had been bumped down from its initial rating of 7 to 1, was just increased to 3. In other words, there’s a lot of uncertainty about what to do, and the situation is nowhere near being resolved.

Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on September 1, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

First, this week’s featured story: Van Gogh Museum 3D Prints Its Own PaintingsAlthough for now the price-tag makes them an expensive gift shop item, I wonder what the future uses could be? Hands-on experiences for kids and school visits? Greater access for those with low vision?

A 3D Print of Van Gogh’s Wheatfield Under Thunderclouds. Courtesy of Hyperallergic.

 

In other news:  Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-up

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 30, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

 

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Special Edition – Why I Don’t Hate James Durston

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 29, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

You may have read this week that CNN Travel’s senior producer James Durston hates museums.

If, like me, you work in a museum, Durston’s opinion piece may have really grilled your cheese. I’ll be the first to admit, I had steam coming out of my ears. But before you sharpen your pitchforks and light up the torches to chase him out of town, I encourage you to stop, take a breath, and consider this:

Durston’s article is the Miley Cyrus VMA performance of museum criticism – it is so over the top and so clearly baiting us to react that it deserves to be met with the most minimal reaction possible.

So rather than a ranting response, I suggest we take a calm and critical look at Durston’s complaints. Let’s start a conversation about how we can fix the legitimate problems he brings up, and clear up the misconceptions he’s trying to perpetuate. Read more…

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Games, games, games…

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 27, 2013 in education, food for thought, technology |

by editor Phillippa Pitts

Games have been on my mind a lot this week. I know a lot of people who spend their incredible brainpower building games for museums, like Kellian Adams Pletcher with Murder at the Met, or Susan Edward with the Getty’s Switch (which I admire for its incredible simplicity!). I’ve even built a few games myself with SCVNGR. Nevertheless, I tend to approach gamification from a skeptical starting point.

This week, two new games crossed my desk that couldn’t be more different from each other: History Hero and Papers, Please.

History Heros, Courtesy of HistoryHeros.com

History Heros, Courtesy of HistoryHeros.com

“Papers Please,” courtesy of Slate

Read more…

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Change is Gonna Come

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 26, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

My family and I saw Lee Daniel’s The Butler last weekend. It sparked a family conversation about change over time. The main question: Can individuals – and then, by association, institutions – change? And what does it really take to implement that change?

We all had differing opinions.

People can change, my sister posited. Given enough evidence, smart people almost always will change their opinions to support the “right” side of things.

People change superficially, my parents submitted. One can intellectually change a position, but emotions are deep-seated, and the way one really feels about things – deep down on the inside – is usually pretty unwavering.

I think I was perhaps the most radical. Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 25, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

First, what do you think? Should Scotland Yard open its grisly murder museum to the public? Read the article and share your thoughts in the comments. Educational? Icky? Unethical?

The pot and cooker used by murderer Dennis Nilsen to boil his victims’ flesh features in the museum. Courtesy of The Daily Express.

In other news:  Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-up

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 23, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

Also, this week, an internship opportunity with Tufts professor David Guss, preparing for his exhibition, Scenic Views: A Picture Postcard History of Somerville.

 

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Science in Museums: Art and Science Collide at the National Building Museum

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 21, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Kacie Rice

My summer internship in Washington, D.C., has given me a great opportunity to explore a lot of new (to me) museums. This weekend, I checked out the National Building Museum, established by Act of Congress in 1980 and located in the historic 1887 Pension Bureau building in downtown Washington. The building itself is definitely befitting of a museum of architecture and city planning: the outside is an impressive red brick façade with a wraparound frieze depicting various military units, while the inside is a cavernous space supported by eight huge Corinthian columns. Multiple Presidents have held their inauguration balls inside the building, and it is regularly used for political events. Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 18, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

But first, if you’re still in the Boston area, don’t forget to check out our newest and tiniest Museum located right in Union Square.

 

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 18, 2013 in jobs listings |

Apologies for my tardiness with the listing. Nevertheless, here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Science in Museums: 8 Reasons You Need to Visit the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 14, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by Catherine Sigmond

When people go to Paris, they always want to visit the Louvre. But did you know that Paris also has the world’s most popular science museum? Here are 8 reasons you should visit the Cité des Science et de l’Industrie next time you’re in the City of Love.

Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 11, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

Also: Not sure if Museum is an actual museum or not, but worth reading about and browsing their Flickr page! Could this sort of speakeasy gallery be a possibility for other museums? (Also featured in the NYTimes)

 

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 9, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Science in Museums: What makes a successful hands-on demonstration in the gallery?

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 7, 2013 in Science in Museums |
by columnist Cira Brown
I’ve been doing the “Perceptual Form of the City” hands-on demo at the MIT Museum for almost a year now, and it’s my first experience in engaging with visitors in the museum directly.  The premise for the demo is as follows: I ask the visitors to draw a map of Boston and then ask them to consider why they chose certain features and compare it to other maps that I have on hand. I then relate patterns in their drawings to the research of MIT Professor Kevin A. Lynch and his book Images of the City (1960), which is a landmark text in urban planning. In the 1950′s, Professor Lynch asked both visitors and residents of Boston to draw the city, and found insights into what details make a city “work” and what doesn’t. I’m not going to go into details in hopes that you’ll swing by the MIT Museum one weekend and participate!
Recently, I’ve been reflecting on what makes this demonstration successful, especially since I’m in the midst of creating my own. I’ve adapted the way I engage with visitors since starting out at the museum last autumn, and here’s a list of things that I’ve found helps ensure success:

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Exhibit Review – SPY: The Secret World of Espionage

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 5, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

I have never had the desire to design exhibits, write labels or work in conservation. When it comes to museums, I am Team Education, Outreach and Interpretation through and through.

But I still want exhibits to be well executed. It makes my job easier as an educator if I have good material to work with; it makes my time as a visitor more enjoyable if I can follow an exhibit’s narrative thread.

spy-franklin-institute- Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 4, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

But perhaps the most hot-button issue of the week was the Smithsonian’s request to acquire Trayvon Martin’s hoodie for their museum collections. (Here’s the NY Post article.) What do you think?

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on August 2, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Food for Thought

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 29, 2013 in Uncategorized |

Have you checked out AAM’s excellence in label-writing award winners?

View all the winning entries here!

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 26, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Learning from 100-year-old Museum Education

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 25, 2013 in education, food for thought |

Check out this amazing story from the Sunderland Museum. In 1913, their curator came up with a program for blind visitors–adults and children–to let them explore objects. Architectural columns, historical gas masks, and scores of natural history specimens were included.

courtesy of Atlas Obscura

courtesy of Atlas Obscura

Make sure you scroll to the end of the article to see the clay models that the visitors made after their visit. Really incredible!

How is this different from what we do today?

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: I’ve Got a Bone to Pick

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 22, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

I think I might be desensitized to extra disgusting things. I regularly see kids eating things they definitely shouldn’t eat. I’ve seen lots and lots of blood spurting from noses and foreheads and knees after tumbles down stairs. I get sneezed on, and coughed on, and just this week a toddler wiped her wet thumb – fresh from a good thirty minutes of sucking – right down my neck.

Maybe it’s part of working at a children’s museum. Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 21, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

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Weekly Jobs Round-Up

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 19, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Science in Museums: Science Museums and History of Science Museums

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 17, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Cira Brown

I’ve recently been doing a bit of work for the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, part of the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture. I love the CHSI and have used it and its exhibitions as a basis for some of my papers here at Tufts. Over the past year I’ve also had internship and volunteer experiences at the Museum of Science and the MIT Museum, and have watched an assortment of visitors engage with each museum’s content. Each of these Boston-area museums attract different types of people, and I want to explore their expectations of their museum visits. I’m also curious as to whether their visit was motivated by an interest in history, science, or even the history of science – and even whether that expectation makes any difference at all.

Read more…

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Whose Program is This Anyway?

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 15, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp,

You may have heard that the great improv comedy show of the late ‘90’s Whose Line is it Anyway? is making a comeback this summer.

As museum professionals, I think it behooves us all to watch it. Why? Because a) everyone needs a good laugh now and again, and b) I’m a firm believer that running a museum education program is actually just an exercise in improv comedy. Read more…

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 12, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Summer Reading, Anyone?

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 11, 2013 in book recommendations |

With summer classes at Tufts kicking off this week, we thought we’d offer a few suggestions for those of us who aren’t in class to keep up the good work. (Of course, our reading is all beach-worthy!)

This week’s recommendation is from Program Director, Cynthia Robinson:

Mary Kay Zuravleff’s fictitious but totally believable National Museum of Asian Art takes center stage in her funny and offbeat book, The Bowl Is Already Broken (2006). Zuravleff, who worked as an editor at the Smithsonian, used her insider’s knowledge to construct wickedly accurate depictions of the quirky but devoted people who work in museums and confront-or cause-many of the big and small issues that we discuss in “Museums Today.”

Looking for more books? Check out the “Read More” tab. We’re storing all the suggestions (summery and otherwise) right there.

Have a book you’d like to recommend? Email Phillippa at tuftsmuseumblog[at]gmail.com.

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Science in Museums: Rethinking Accessibility: Don’t Leave English Language Learners Behind

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 10, 2013 in Science in Museums |

By columnist Catherine Sigmond

Let’s face it. English has become the global language, the lingua franca that links us all together. It’s also increasingly being recognized as the international language of science.

For non-native English speakers, the necessity of being able to read, speak, and publish research in English is an ever-growing hurdle.

Of course, the expanding use of the English language touches many more disciplines than just the hard sciences. But the fact remains that many of those who may be interested in pursuing careers in science may be hampered by their lack of high-level English language skills.
Read more…

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Free Workshop? On Grant Writing? Yes, please!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 10, 2013 in boston emps, professional development |

One week from today, the Boston EMPs will be hosting a free grant writing workshop with Christine Cunningham, Ph.D., the founder and director of the Museum of Science’s Engineering is Elementary program.

The EMPs are a fantastic group to get to know, so RSVP to BostonEMPs[at]gmail.com to save a spot.

The workshop will be held at 7pm on Wednesday, July 17 at the USS Constitution Museum (Charlestown Navy Yard Building 22 Boston, MA 02129 for your GPS needs.)

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 7, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 5, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

  • Manager of Family Programs [Museum of Fine Arts, Boston] Under the direction of the Head of Gallery Learning, the Manager of Family Programs will coordinate and facilitate gallery learning experiences for young audiences. Essential functions include: Design and implement family learning activities for specific museum-wide events, such as School Vacation Week and Community Open Houses, as well as family events coordinated by  Membership and …
  • Learning Programs Developer [Providence Children¹s Museum]Providence Children¹s Museum has served the public since 1977 and now welcomes 160,000 visitors a year; its mission is to inspire and celebrate learning through active play and exploration.  The Learning Programs Developer is primarily responsible for the development and functioning of play and learning experiences at the Museum and in the community for children ages 2 to 11. Responsibilities include: Supervise …
  • Coordinator of Adult Public Programs and Volunteer Corps [American Folk Art Museum] Position Description: The American Folk Art Museum is the premier institution devoted to the aesthetic appreciation of traditional folk art and creative expressions of contemporary self-taught artists from the United States and abroad. The museum preserves, conserves, and interprets a comprehensive collection of the highest quality, with objects dating from the eighteenth century to the present. Position SummaryThe Coordinator of Adult …
  • Professional Development and Web Technology (Education Specialist) [Cooper Hewitt] Position Title: Professional Development and Web Technology (Education Specialist) Position Description: Federal Career Opportunity:This position is located at the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (CHNDM). The employee serves as the program manager for professional development and web technology, including large-scale events, hands-on workshops and conferences. Travel across the United States is required. A driver’s license is highly desirable since travel will be required …

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Loosen Up My Buttons, Babe

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on July 1, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

Metbuttons2

I like to think I came of age in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. During my sophomore and junior years of high school, I spent countless hours wandering the halls of the Met on school field trips. I was typically the first off the bus, sprinting into the museum at full speed, and always the last one back, moseying to the bus slowly, wishing I could spend just five minutes more. Consequently, I have many fond memories of the Met.

Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on June 30, 2013 in museums in the news |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

My favorite story of the week? “Ancient Egyptian statue at Manchester Museum moves on its own, stumped curator says.” (Got an answer? Please please please tell me in the comments!)

And my least favorite article this week: How Shocking: Met Unbuttons. It’s the end of an era!

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Weekly Jobs Round-up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on June 27, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

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Science in Museums: Sensory Science, Visualizing Climate Change

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on June 26, 2013 in Science in Museums |

by columnist Kacie Rice

Those who have worked in scientific research know that it’s often a world ruled by numbers and formulas. Even studies based on a mineral’s color or an animal’s morphology (that is, its basic shape and look) have to be backed up by numerical data and rigorous statistical calculations. It’s not enough for me to say, “yep, that rock looks mostly purple to me;” in a scientific publication, I would have to present data on optical density and other factors, and additionally show that these calculations are repeatable under laboratory conditions.

Read more…

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Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Meet the Museum! Hollis Bowe, Major Gifts Coordinator at Ford’s Theater, Washington DC

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on June 24, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

Welcome back to Dispatch’s on-going series Meet The Museum! This week we are talking to Hollis Bowe, Major Gifts Coordinator at Ford’s Theater in Washington DC. Hollis is a passionate advocate for big cats’ rights and a graduate of Tufts University!

HollisBowe

Read more…

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Museums in the News

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on June 23, 2013 in jobs listings |

Here’s our weekly round-up of our favorite things that were said about museums this week: the good, the bad, and the really quite strange!

0

Weekly Jobs Round-Up!

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on June 20, 2013 in jobs listings |

Welcome to our weekly roundup of new jobs. As always, they go up immediately on their own page. Happy hunting!

0

Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic: Castles (And Dragons and Mermaids) Made of Sand

Posted by Phillippa Pitts on June 17, 2013 in Dispatches from the Mid-Atlantic |

by columnist Madeline Karp

I’ve been known to complain that Atlantic City is a culture vacuum. People don’t come to Atlantic City to take in Shakespeare, look at fine art or go to wine tastings. They come to go to get tanned, ogle half-naked girls at the beach, and get trashed on over-priced drinks at the beach bars. If you want refinement, the locals say here, go to Philadelphia. This is the Shore, baby.

So you can imagine my (pleasant) surprise when I stumbled across the 2013 World Championship Sand Sculpting Competition hosted right on the beach in Atlantic City. Twenty champions from around the world qualified to compete as solo artists and in pairs.

Read more…

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