Museum Studies at Tufts University

Exploring ideas and engaging in conversation

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Weekly Jobs Roundup

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. Happy hunting!

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Survey Update and New Blog Features!

For those of us in the Boston area, hopefully you are all enjoying this snowy day! First of all, thank you each and every one of you who took the time to complete the recent survey for the Blog. Each of your responses helps us understand what we’re doing well, what you as the reader want out of the blog, and how we can expand into new areas. That said, here are the results of the survey and what new things you can expect to see on the blog in the future:

  • Jobs Postings: The overwhelming majority of respondents indicated that jobs postings were the most important category of postings they want to see on the blog. As many of you also indicated that you would like to see the jobs postings categorized by region of the US, going forward the jobs postings will have jobs broken up by region within the posting.
  • New Post Series: Many of you indicated that you would like to see new and different post series on the Blog. You also noted that you would like to see more Museums in the News and Professional Development postings. These, as well as a new series called Museum Questions (where we address and discuss interesting and sometimes difficult questions we deal with as museum professionals), will be expanded and/or created in the near future. Keep an eye out!
  • Alumni Connections: To maintain our ties with the Tufts Museum Studies alumni out in the world, we’d like to begin doing periodic alumni interviews where we talk about life after grad school, your jobs, and advice for incoming students or emerging museum professionals. If you are an alumni and are interested in being interviewed, please email the blog at tufts.museum.blog@gmail.com. We’d love to hear from you!

Again, thank you to all who responded to the survey and who read the blog weekly. We wouldn’t be here without you!

Curator [Natick Historical Society, Natick, MA]

CURATOR

Founded in 1870, Natick Historical Society celebrates the town’s rich history through a varied collection and educational programs. The NHS seeks a part-time Curator to collaborate in moving the organization forward in its collection management and program goals.

The Curator will manage the preservation, interpretation, exhibition and storage of its object collections and its photographs. He/she will also be a partner in management and delivery of many of our outreach programs i.e. organization and delivery of our 3rd grade program.

The Curator will work closely with the director and board in defining the vision for the collections and with the Collections Committee in carrying out that vision;
· Work with volunteers who aid in curatorial and program activities;
· Keep collections records, including accessions and deaccessions;
· Design 1 – 2 temporary exhibits per year and redesign and install some permanent exhibits

This is a year-round, 24 hour per week position. Occasional evening and weekend work required.

Requirements: Minimum of B.A. in museum studies or related field; schooling in American history with at least one year of experience preferred; knowledge of the principles and practices of collections management; experience in database administration (especially Past Perfect); proficiency with MS Office with graphics programs a plus; fluent writing and speaking skills. Ability to work cooperatively with staff and volunteers; excellent time management, and creativity; must have confidence in voicing independent judgment on museum matters.

Weekly Jobs Roundup

Here’s our weekly roundup of new jobs. Happy hunting!

New England 

Mid-Atlantic

Midwest

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Other

Museum Questions: Resonance and Wonder

 

In his short article “Resonance and Wonder,” Stephen Greenblatt explores two of the most central concepts that inform a museum-goer’s experience: resonance and wonder. While the article was written in 1990, the topic of resonance and wonder in museums is one that is still very relevant to museums today. Like the definition of the word, Greenblatt’s ideas on resonance are multi-faceted. Resonance, he asserts, is “the power of the displayed object to reach out beyond its formal boundaries to a larger world, to evoke in the viewer the complex, dynamic cultural forces from which it has emerged and for which it may be taken by a viewer to stand.” In this sense, he is touching on the idea that objects in a museum should be examined within the larger context of all the influences that helped shape that object such that any viewer coming from any standpoint may be able to connect with that piece. He further notes that resonance within a museum setting also refers to the notion of an echo or reverberation, as with sound, and connects this to the idea of an object having its own voice separate from any other agenda. The object then has the ability to take on its own character and, as he says, intimate “a larger community of voices and skills, an imagined ethnographic thickness.” In essence, an object or museum resonates with visitors when they are able to connect with it, get a sense of the context in which it was formed, formulate questions, conversations, and/or ideas about it within that context, and come away with a deeper understanding of it because of the interaction they have had.

Greenblatt’s definition of wonder, on the other hand, while deeply connected with resonance, lacks the sense of understanding that resonance instills and favors the ‘wow-factor.’ Wonder is instead a tool which may or may not lead to resonance, invoked by the object’s ability to “stop the viewer in his or her tracks, to convey an arresting sense of uniqueness, to evoke an exalted attention.”  Wonder can be invoked not only by the object itself, but the way in which it is displayed within the museum, such as with boutique lighting or placement within a coveted area in the museum. In any case, Greenblatt argues that the most successful exhibitions begin with an “appeal to wonder, a wonder that then leads to the desire for resonance, for it is generally easier in our culture to pass from wonder to resonance than from resonance to wonder.” Wonder and resonance can thus work in concert to produce the most impactful museum experience, one in which the visitor is both awed by and more deeply informed by an object simply by experiencing it under the right circumstances.

How do you see resonance and wonder play out in your museum? Does one necessarily lead to the other, and can a visitor fluctuate between the two? How can a museum invoke both resonance and wonder at the same time, or is it possible to do so? Is wonder still valuable without resonance, and vice-versa? Which do you think is more important for a visitor to walk away from the museum with, resonance, or wonder? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

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