Oncology

Clinical trials for Oncology specialty

  • Description

    Weight loss is one of the few factors that have consistently been shown to be associated with shortened survival in people with lymphoma. This study aims to document how often dogs experience weight loss or decrease in muscle mass at the time that lymphoma is diagnosed, and whether this finding impacts how dogs respond to treatment.

    Inclusion Criteria

    Dogs with multicentric lymphoma that have undergone full staging.

    Exclusion Criteria

    Prior chemotherapy (including prednisone) or dogs with lymphoma within the gastrointestinal tract.

    Client Benefits

    None

    Contact Information

    Kelly Reed, Oncology Liaison
    Phone: (508) 887-4682

  • Description

    The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University was selected as a contributing site for theCCOGC Biospecimen Repository. This is an innovative multi-institutional endeavor organized by researchers at the NCI to create a large tissue repository of spontaneous canine cancers.

    The tissues within these repositories will be used for future investigations by researchers at locations across the country to allow a better understanding of canine and human cancers.

    Inclusion Criteria

    Any dog that will be undergoing a surgical procedure as part of his/her treatment. At the time of surgery, the tumor is sent to the pathology laboratory for diagnosis or examination. When these tests are completed, the remainder of the tissue is usually discarded. We would like to acquire any left over tissue to use for archiving purposes.

    Exclusion Criteria

    None.

    Client Benefits

    There is no direct benefit for participating in the tissue collection and banking. However your participation may help in understanding the genetic basis for canine (and possibly human) cancers.

    Contact Information

    Kristin Marshall, Oncology Clinical Trials Coordinator
    Phone: (508) 887-4422

  • Description

    The main goals of this study are to correlate the different histologic subtypes of canine lymphoma with gene expression and response to treatment and survival time.

    Inclusion Criteria

    All dogs with newly diagnosed multicentric lymphoma that have enlarged peripheral lymph nodes are eligible for entry into this study.

    Exclusion Criteria

    Patients that have received prior chemotherapy are not eligible for participation in this study.

    Client Benefits

    The owner is financially responsible for all tests that determine if the patient qualifies for the study. These tests may include initial specialty examination, blood and urine tests.

    The study will cover the costs of blood collection and histopathologic evaluation, including immunophenotype of your dog’s lymph node tissue (if applicable).

    Contact Information

    Kelly Reed, Oncology Liaison
    Phone: (508) 887-4682

  • Description

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in dogs. Despite aggressive treatment with surgery and chemotherapy, most dogs die of metastatic disease that is resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Metronomic chemotherapy entails very small doses of chemotherapy that are given daily or every other day and help to deter the growth of new blood vessels needed to nourish cancer as it grows. Side effects associated with metronomic chemotherapy tend to be milder and less frequent than those seen with standard chemotherapy. The goal of this study is to evaluate for an increased disease free interval in dogs treated with standard of care surgery and chemotherapy followed with maintenance metronomic or low dose chemotherapy.

    Inclusion Criteria

    Dogs with osteosarcoma that have completed a standard course of chemotherapy after limb amputation.

    Exclusion Criteria

    Dogs with a life expectancy of less than 1 month or who have lower urinary tract disease are ineligible to participate in this study.

    Client Benefits

    This study is not funded; so pet owners are responsible for all costs associated with this treatment.

    Contact Information

    Kelly Reed, Oncology Liaison
    Phone: (508) 887-4682

  • Description

    This preclinical trial, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, is designed to evaluate three new chemotherapy agents in the indenoisoquinoline class. These drugs inhibit topoisomerase I, which is an enzyme important in DNA replication, and have shown efficacy in a variety of cancers.
    The intent of this study is to define and compare the pharmacologic effects of these three drugs in dogs with lymphoma. Specifically, the study will assess basic properties of the drug, such as duration of action, markers of damage to DNA in cancer cells, and safety. The goal is to determine the appropriate dose of each drug and to determine if there are differences in biologic activity among the drugs. The response to treatment, specifically whether lymphoma goes into remission in the treated dogs, will also be assessed.

    Inclusion Criteria

    • Dogs of any age
    • Cytologically or histologically confirmed diagnosis of lymphoma involving multiple external lymph nodes
    • Dogs must be feeling well or only minimally compromised
    • Dogs either must not have received treatment for lymphoma for at least 2 weeks prior to enrollment in the study

    Exclusion Criteria

    • Significant illness (such as kidney failure, liver disease, heart failure, severe anemia)
    • Dogs weighing less than 33 pounds
    • Dogs who have received prednisone for any reason in the two weeks prior to study enrollment

    Client Benefits

    This study is fully funded and will cover the cost of treatment, monitoring tests and management of treatment related side effects. Dogs that complete the 28-day study will be eligible to receive $1000 for further medical care at Tufts.

    Contact Information

    Kelly Reed, Oncology Liaison
    Phone: (508) 887-4682
    Email: Veterinaryoncology@tufts.edu

  • Description:

    Lymphoma is one of the most common cancers in the dog and is comparable to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in humans. Chemotherapy is the standard of care for treatment and can provide long term disease control but survival beyond 2 years is rare.

    There is active investigation into the utility of metabolic markers, such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), as a predictor of response to treatment in humans with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Additionally these markers may serve as a target for future therapy.

    The goal of this study is to assess levels of IGF-1 and other related blood biomarkers in canine patients with lymphoma. We will evaluate these markers for prognostic value and will determine whether they could serve as targets for therapy in the future.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Dogs with a confirmed diagnosis of multicentric lymphoma (cytology or pathology), weighing more than 25kg. Dogs must be eating a commercial diet and be otherwise healthy.

    Exclusion Criteria:

    Dogs with other systemic diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, Cushing’s disease, kidney disease, liver disease, etc). Dogs eating a home-cooked or raw diet.

    Client Benefits:

    No direct benefits. Dog owners are financially responsible for the costs associated with cancer staging plus standard chemotherapy and recommended treatment monitoring (weekly complete blood counts).

    This study covers the cost of measurement of IGF-1 and other metabolites.

    Contact Information:

    Kelly Reed, Oncology liaison

    508-887-4682

     

     

     

     

  • Description

    The goal of this study is to evaluate therapy with toceranib (Palladia®), an oral anticancer agent, in combination with palliative radiation therapy for tolerability, toxicity, and efficacy in a population of dogs with measurable carcinomas. Carcinomas are a common malignancy in both dogs and humans. As a category of cancer, carcinomas tend to be both locally invasive as well as carry a high risk of locoregional metastasis. While most dogs diagnosed in early stages may respond well to multimodality therapy, survival is generally thought to be shorter for bulky or metastatic tumors. New treatments for advanced carcinomas are needed to improve patient comfort and survival.

    Inclusion Criteria

    Dogs with cytologic or histology confirmation of the following carcinomas are eligible to participate in this study: anal sac adenocarcinoma, ceruminous gland carcinoma, mammary gland carcinoma, nasal carcinoma, prostatic carcinoma, salivary gland carcinoma, sebaceous adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, rectal carcinoma, thyroid carcinoma, or transitional cell carcinoma of the urethra. The patient must have measurable disease at the primary tumor site and/or metastatic lymph nodes. Dogs should be otherwise in good health, a candidate for 10 daily anesthetic episodes, and must have adequate organ function as determined by blood work and urinalysis. Previous chemotherapy or surgery is allowable provided it is a minimum of 2 weeks prior to enrollment in the trial. Prior NSAID therapy is allowed if the patient has been on this therapy for minimum of 2 weeks prior to enrollment. Any homeopathic/alternative therapies for cancer must be discontinued prior to enrollment.

    Exclusion Criteria

    The following carcinomas are ineligible for participation: adrenocortical carcinoma, gastrointestinal carcinoma (excluding rectal), renal carcinoma, or transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. Dogs are also ineligible if they have received prior radiation therapy to the tumor site.

    Client Benefits

    Clients participating in this study will be given special financial considerations. Specifically, the study will cover the following costs associated with participation in this clinical trial: the cost of Palladia for 12 weeks, $1250 towards radiation therapy, one set of chest x-rays (at week 12), and recheck exam fees at week 3, 4, 6, and 12 of the study. This amounts to a total financial benefit of approximately $2200.

    The client will be responsible for general anesthesia and costs for the CT scan (if required); all radiation therapy costs beyond $1250; all costs associated with monitoring blood work and urinalyses during the study period and beyond; and any diagnostic tests (x-rays, abdominal ultrasound, etc.) and recheck exam fees beyond week 12. The client is expected to make and keep all appointments, according to the clinical trial protocol once enrolled.

    Contact Information

    Kelly Reed, Oncology Liaison
    Phone: (508) 887-4682

  • Description:

    Cancer is one of the most common conditions seen in older dogs and it is becoming more common for owners to opt to treat their pets with chemotherapy.  Dogs undergoing chemotherapy may suffer from side effects of treatment such as vomiting, diarrhea, and reduced appetite.  There are currently no commercial diets that are designed specifically to help support dogs with cancer undergoing chemotherapy by reducing the gastrointestinal side effects of chemotherapy.

    The purpose of the study is to determine whether a specially formulated diet may reduce gastrointestinal side effects associated with chemotherapy and improve quality of life of dogs undergoing chemotherapy.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    • Dogs > 1 year of age with multicentric lymphoma (LSA) and grade 2 or higher mast cell tumors (MCT) that will be treated with standard (non-metronomic) chemotherapy protocols at a participating study site.
    • Weight > 5 kg, temperament suitable for drawing blood without sedation
    • All dogs should be naïve to treatment for the current cancer, but can have been treated for other cancers in the past if greater than 1 year prior.

    Exclusion Criteria:

    • Other diseases expected to potentially decrease quality of life, alter survival time, or limit diet options – e.g. significant heart disease, kidney disease, bad liver disease, etc.
    • Current vomiting or diarrhea or a history of chronic vomiting or diarrhea (more than 6 multi-day episodes per year or one month of consistent clinical signs) within the last year that required medications or special diet for control
    • Dogs with anticipated life expectancy of < 4 months
    • Pet owner not willing to feed prescribed diet and limit treats to 5% of calories

    Dogs will be fed either a high quality control diet appropriate for dog maintenance or the specially designed study diet – neither the pet owners nor the researchers will know which diet the dog is getting. Pet owners will need to fill out quality of life surveys as well as diet journals and fecal score journals every 1-2 weeks, and bring their dogs in for study visits/chemotherapy every 2 weeks. At three points during the study, blood and urine will be collected from fasted dogs.

    Treats and dietary supplements will need to be restricted to only those provided on an approved treat and supplement list.

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover the costs of all study-related blood work and visits.  You will also receive free high quality pet food for the two month study duration and a $300 credit towards your account balance when you and your dog successfully complete the study and return all study-related paperwork.  The study does not include the costs of cancer staging (including those required to determine study eligibility), or any costs associated with surgery or chemotherapy, additional blood work not required for the study, or follow-up visits outside of those described above.  Your dog’s participation will also allow us to gain information which will help in the management of other dogs undergoing chemotherapy.

    Contact Information:

    To make an appointment with the oncology department please call the oncology liason, Kelly Reed at 508-887-4682

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: diane.welsh@tufts.edu

  • Purpose of Study”: The cancer that most commonly affects the mouth of cats is called oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).  This cancer is common and responds poorly to treatment.  The average life-expectancy for cats diagnosed with this cancer is about 6 months with only 10-20% of cats alive 1 year after diagnosis.  Cats may exhibit a number of problems as a result of OSCC including a swelling in the head/throat, lack of appetite, difficulty eating or swallowing, decreased grooming behavior, excessive salivation, foul odor to breath, change in voice or difficulty in vocalizing. The purpose of this study is to determine if a drug called “Anginex” would provide a safe and effective means of treating OSCC in cats. Anginex is a peptide (small protein) that interferes with the ability of a tumor to make and maintain its blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis.  Cancer drugs that target the blood supply of a tumor are called “anti-angiogenic “or “anti-vascular” agents.  Because tumors need a blood supply to grow beyond microscopic size, inhibiting angiogenesis prevents tumors from growing and can cause tumors to shrink.  Anginex has been used in mice experimentally.  In this current study, our goals are to ensure that this agent is safe for cats and also to determine whether it has any effects on the tumor and its blood vessels and oxygen levels.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    1.  Cats with a diagnosis of OSCC.
    2. Cats that have not received radiation or chemotherapy (including Palladia) for treatment of the cancer.
    3. The tumor has not been surgically removed.
    4. The tumor is measurable and accessible.

    Exclusion Criteria:

    1. Cats with other systemic diseases that are uncontrolled and likely to compromise the ability of the cat to complete treatment.
    2. Tumors that are not readily accessible to biopsy and other procedures.

    Client Benefits: The study will cover the costs of certain diagnostic tests and treatment.  These include: biopsy and pathologist evaluation of tissue, blood and urine evaluation, advanced imaging with PET/MRI and CT, which can aide in future treatments of the tumor such as surgery or radiation therapy. The study will not cover the cost of the initial consultation with the oncology service.

    Contact Information: To make an appointment with the oncology department please call the oncology liason, Kelly Reed at 508-887-4682 For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

  • Description: Acute radiation-induced dermatitis (ARID) is a common sequela of radiation therapy in both humans and dogs, arising in greater than 80-90% of patients undergoing definitive intent radiotherapy. Although relatively short-lived, skin reactions can be painful and itchy (which promotes secondary self-trauma in veterinary patients) and occasionally may necessitate dose reductions or treatment delays, which carry the potential to compromise tumor control. Another complication of radiation dermatitis is secondary infection. Although antibiotic use in the management of canine ARID is common practice amongst veterinary radiation oncologists, this management practice lacks evidence to support its use. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of prophylactic cephalexin antibiotics on rate of bacterial infection in ARID in dogs undergoing definitive-intent radiotherapy of the skin or subcutaneous tissues. Secondary objectives include characterization of the bacterial pathogens encountered in ARID as well as their antibiotic susceptibility.

    Inclusion Criteria

    1. All dogs must have a histologically or cytologically confirmed skin or superficial soft tissue cancer, including soft tissue sarcomas, mast cell tumors, cutaneous melanoma, plasma cell tumors, infiltrative lipomas, and carcinomas.
    2. All dogs must be treated with definitive intent radiotherapy, defined as dose ≥45 Gy or higher.
    3. Prior surgery or chemotherapy is acceptable with a 2-week washout.
    4. Prior glucocorticoid therapy is allowed if the patient has been on this therapy for a minimum of 2 weeks prior to Day 0.
    5. Prior antibiotic therapy is acceptable within a 1-week washout from the start of radiotherapy.
    1. Dogs should be otherwise in good health, a candidate for daily anesthetic episodes, and must have adequate organ function as determined by blood work and urinalysis.
    2. Any homeopathic/alternative therapies for cancer must be discontinued prior to enrollment.

    Exclusion Criteria

    1. Tumors located in the oral or nasal cavities, on the muzzle, or in the perineal region.
    2. Dogs that had a surgical flap procedure at the radiation site.
    3. Dogs that experienced a post-operative surgical infection.
    4. Dogs that require concurrent chemotherapy.
    5. Dogs that have received prior radiation therapy to the tumor site.
    6. Dogs that are currently on antibiotic therapy.
    7. Dogs with pre-existing dermatopathies.

     

    Client Benefits

    The study will cover the costs associated with skin culture and impression cytology. In addition, the exam fee for the recheck at 1 week post-radiation therapy is at no cost. The client will be responsible for all other costs associated with the radiotherapy course as well as the cost of all medications. The client is expected to make and keep all appointments, according to the clinical trial protocol once enrolled.

     

    Have a case?  

    Contact Dr. Michele Keyerleber at (508) 887-4682 or   Michele.Keyerleber@tufts.edu