Spring 2018

A Revolution in Grafton

Over 40 years, Cummings School has built itself into an international leader in veterinary education, expert clinical care, and interdisciplinary research.

By Genevieve Rajewski

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Illustration by Ann Cutting

In 1978, Tufts University made the bold decision to start a new kind of veterinary school to serve New England—one that would intertwine veterinary medicine with human and environmental health. In the four decades since, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine has become an international leader in education, clinical care, and interdisciplinary research.
Getting here took the help of students and faculty, university leaders and tireless deans, pet owners and clients, and many generous donors, including the Cummings Foundation, which made a record-breaking gift to the school that now bears its name. In the pages listed below, Tuft’s first veterinary students and professors tell the story of building a school from the ground up. And we highlight five of the key ways the school has had an outsized impact on the health and well-being of people, animals, and the world we share.

Birth of the Veterinary School
Battling Infectious Disease
Built to Excel
Game-Changing Research
Making a Global Impact
Advocating for Animals

We also want to hear what Cummings School means to you, whether you’re a student or alum, faculty member, or friend. Please send your thoughts and memories to
genevieve.rajewski@tufts.edu.

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